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Hannah EMERSON

F, #I410, b. 23 December 1657, d. 06 MAR 1736/37

Family

Marriage 1 : Thomas DUSTON m. 03 December 1677 Haverhill, Essex, Massachusetts, USA, b. abt. 1652, d. bef. 17 November 1732

  1. Nathaniel DUSTON, b. 18 May 1685, d. abt. 1753
  2. Hannah DUSTON, b. 22 August 1678, d. 04 January 1746
  3. Elizabeth DUSTON, b. 07 May 1680, d. 04 June 1746
  4.    Mary DUSTON, b. 04 November 1681, d. 16 October 1696
  5. Thomas DUSTON, b. 05 January 1683, d. 24 February 1767
  6.    John DUSTON, b. 02 February 1686, d. 28 January 1690
  7. Sarah DUSTON, b. 04 July 1688, d. UNKNOWN
  8. Abigail DUSTON, b. October 1690, d. 05 May 1727
  9. Jonathan DUSTON, b. 15 January 1692, d. 1757
  10. Timothy DUSTON, b. 14 September 1694, d. abt. 1741
  11.    Mehitable DUSTON, b. 14 September 1694, d. 16 December 1694
  12.    Martha DUSTON, b. 09 March 1697, d. 15 March 1697
  13. Lydia DUSTON, b. 04 October 1698, d. aft. 1764

Notes:

[Myers.ftw]

Hannah Emerson Dustin,was a heroine of the early Indian wars in New England. At the time of the attack on Haverhill MA., Mar 15, 1697, the indians captured Hannah and her nurse, Mary Neff, and killed the youngest Dustin child who was only a week old. Thomas, with their other seven children, managed to escape death. The captives were assigned to an Indian family of 12 persons and led to a larger village. On an island, now called Dustan's Island, near Concord, Hannah and her nurse, assisted by a captive English boy, Samuel Leonardson, killed and scalped all of their captors except one squaw and a small boy. Afterward they reached their homes in safety. Their exploit has furnished the theme for much romance and verse. The name is also spelled Dustan and Duston. (New Standard Encyclopedia)

The Story Of Hannah Emerson Dustin

From "Historical Collections, Being a General Collection of Interesting Facts, Traditions, Biographical Sketches, Anecdotes, &c., Relating to the History and Antiquities of Every Town in Massachusetts, with Geographical Descriptions" by John Warner Barber, published 1839 by Dorr, Howland & Co.

On the 15th of March, 1697, a body of Indians made a descent on the westerly part of the town, and approached the house of Mr. Thomas Dustin. They came, as they were wont, arrayed with all the terrors of a savage war dress, with their muskets charged for the contest, their tomahawks drawn for the slaughter, and their scalping knives unsheathed and glittering in the sunbeams. Mr. Dustin at this time was engaged abroad in his daily labor. When the terrific shouts of the blood-hounds first fell on his ear, he seized his gun, mounted his horse, and hastened to his house, with the hope of escorting to a place of safety his family, which consisted of his wife, whom he tenderly and passionately loved, and who had been confined only seven days in childbed, her nurse, Mrs. Mary Neff, and eight young children. Immediately upon his arrival, he rushed into his house, and found it a scene of confusion - the women trembling for their safety, and the children weeping and calling on their mother for protection. He instantly ordered seven of his children to fly in an opposite direction from that in which the danger
was approaching, and went himself to assist his wife. But he was too late - before she could arise from her bed, the enemy were upon them.
Mr. Dustin, seeing there was no hope of saving his wife from the clutches of the foe, flew from the house, mounted his horse, and rode full speed after his flying children. The agonized father supposed it impossible to save them all, and he determined to snatch from death the child which shared the most of his affections. He soon came up with the infant brood; he heard their glad voices and saw the cheerful looks that overspread their countenances, for they felt themselves safe while under his protection. He looked for the child of his love - where was it? He scanned the little group from the oldest to the youngest, but he could not find it. They all fondly loved him - they called him by the endearing title of father, were flesh of his flesh, and stretched out their little arms toward him for protection. He gazed upon them, and faltered in his resolution, for there was none whom he could leave behind; and, indeed, what parent could, in such a situation, select the child which shared the most of his affections? He could not do it, and therefore resolved to defend them from the murderers, or die at their side.
A small party of the Indians pursued Mr. Dustin as he fled from the house, and soon overtook him and his flying children. They did not, however, approach very near, for they saw his determination, and feared the vengeance of a father, but skulked behind the trees and fences, and fired upon him and his little company. Mr. Dustin dismounted from his horse, placed himself in the rear of his children, and returned the fire of the enemy often and with good success. In this manner he retreated for more than a mile, alternately encouraging his terrified charge, and loading and firing his gun, until he lodged them safely in a forsaken house. The Indians, finding that they could not conquer him, returned to their companions, expecting, no doubt, that they should there find victims, on which they might exercise their savage cruelty.
The party which entered the house when Mr. Dustin left it, found Mrs. Dustin in bed, and the nurse attempting to fly with the infant in her arms. They ordered Mrs. Dustin to rise instantly, while one of them took the infant from the arms of the nurse, carried it out, and dashed out its brains against an apple-tree. After plundering the house they set it on fire, and commenced their retreat, though Mrs. Dustin had but partly dressed herself, and was without a shoe on one of her feet. Mercy was a stranger to the breasts of the conquerors, and the unhappy women expected to receive no kindness from their hands. The weather at the time was exceedingly cold, the March-wind blew keen and piercing, and the earth was alternately covered with snow and deep mud.
They traveled twelve miles the first day, and continued their retreat, day by day, following a circuitous route, until they reached the home of the Indian who claimed them as his property, which was on a small island, now called Dustin's Island, at the mouth of the Contoocook river, about six miles above the state-house in Concord, New Hampshire. Notwithstanding their intense suffering for the death of the child - their anxiety for those whom they had left behind, and who they expected had been cruelly butchered - their sufferings from cold and hunger, and from sleeping on the damp earth, with nothing but an inclement sky for a covering - and their terror for themselves, lest the arm that, as they supposed, had slaughtered those whom they dearly loved, would soon be made red with their blood, - notwithstanding all this, they performed the journey without yielding, and arrived at their destination in comparative health.
The family of their Indian master consisted of two men, three women, and seven children; besides an English boy, named Samuel Lennardson, who was taken prisoner about a year previous, at Worcester. Their master, some years before, had lived in the family of Rev. Mr. Rowlandson, of Lancaster, and he told Mrs. Dustin that "when he prayed the English way he thought it was good, but now he found the French way better."
These unfortunate women had been but a few days with the Indians, when they were informed that they must soon start for a distant Indian settlement, and that, upon their arrival, they would be obliged to conform to the regulations always required of prisoners, whenever they entered the village, which was to be stripped, scourged, and run the gauntlet in a state of nudity. The gauntlet consisted of two files of Indians, of both sexes and of all ages, containing all that could be mustered in the village; and the unhappy prisoners were obliged to run between them, when they were scoffed at and beaten by each one as they passed, and were sometimes marks at which the younger Indians threw their hatchets. This cruel custom was often practiced by many of the tribes, and not infrequently the poor prisoner sunk beneath it. Soon as the two women were informed of this, they determined to escape as speedily as possible. They could not bear to be exposed to the scoffs and unrestrained gaze of their savage conquerors - death would be preferable. Mrs. Dustin soon planned a mode of escape, appointed the 31st inst. for its accomplishment, and prevailed upon her nurse and the boy to join her. The Indians kept no watch, for the boy had lived with them so long they considered him as one of their children, and they did not expect that the women, unadvised and unaided, would attempt to escape, when success, at the best, appeared so desperate.
On the day previous to the 31st, Mrs. Dustin wished to learn on what part of the body the Indians struck their victims when they would dispatch them suddenly, and how they took off a scalp. With this view she instructed the boy to make inquiries of one of the men. Accordingly, at a convenient opportunity, he asked one of them where he would strike a man if he would kill him instantly, and how to take off a scalp. The man laid his finger on his temple - "Strike 'em there," said he; and then instructed him how to scalp. The boy then communicated his information to Mrs. Dustin.
The night at length arrived, and the whole family retired to rest, little suspecting that the most of them would never behold another sun. Long before the break of day, Mrs. Dustin arose, and, having ascertained that they were all in a deep sleep, awoke her nurse and the boy, when they armed themselves with tomahawks, and dispatched ten of the twelve. A favorite boy they designedly left; and one of the squaws, whom they left for dead, jumped up, and ran with him into the woods. Mrs. Dustin killed her master, and Samuel Lennardson dispatched the very Indian who told him where to strike, and how to take off a scalp. The deed was accomplished before the day began to break, and, after securing what little provision the wigwam of their dead master afforded, they scuttled all the boats but one, to prevent pursuit, and with that started for their homes. Mrs. Dustin took with her a gun that belonged to her master, and the tomahawk with which she committed the tragically deed. They had not proceeded far, however, when Mrs. Dustin perceived that they had neglected to take their scalps, and feared that her neighbors, if they ever arrived at their homes, would not credit their story, and would ask them for some token or proof. She told her fears to her companions, and they immediately returned to the silent wigwam, took off the scalps of the fallen, and put them into a bag. They then started on their journey anew, with the gun, tomahawk, and the bleeding trophies, - palpable witnesses of their heroic and unparalleled deed.
A long and weary journey was before them, but they commenced it with cheerful hearts, each alternately rowing and steering their little bark. Though they had escaped from the clutches of their unfeeling master, still they were surrounded with dangers. They were thinly clad, the sky was still inclement, and they were liable to be re-captured by strolling bands of Indians, or by those who would undoubtedly pursue them so soon as the squaw and the boy had reported their departure, and the terrible vengeance they had taken; and were they again made prisoners, they well knew that a speedy death would follow. This array of danger, however, did not appall them for home was their beacon-light, and the thoughts of their firesides nerved their hearts. They continued to drop silently down the river, keeping a good lookout for strolling Indians; and in the night two of them only slept, while the third managed the boat. In this manner they pursued their journey, until they arrived safely, with their trophies, at their homes, totally unexpected by their mourning friends, who supposed that they had been butchered by their ruthless conquerors. It must truly have been an affecting meeting for Mrs. Dustin, who likewise supposed that all she loved, - all she held dear on earth - was laid in the silent tomb.
After recovering from the fatigue of the journey, they started for Boston, where they arrived on the 21st of April. They carried with them the gun and tomahawk, and their ten scalps - those witnesses that would not lie; and while there, the general court gave them fifty pounds, as a reward for their heroism. The report of their daring deed soon spread into every part of the country, and when Colonel Nicholson, governor of Maryland, heard of it, he sent them a very valuable present, and many presents were also made to them by their neighbors.

Hannah Emerson Dustin has a statue erected in the center of Haverhill, MA for
the extensive ordeal she endured when captured by Indians, killed 1 week old Martha, and took her and others just north of Concord NH. They killed the Indians and escaped down the river to Hudson, NH.

A statue of Hannah was erected in Boscawen, MA. The statue claims to be the first America commemorated to a woman in 1874. To the best of our knowledge, this claim still stands to the most celebrated woman we are aware of in our lineage.

Hannah Emerson b. 1657, Haverhill, MA daughter of Michael Emerson & Hannah Webster.
Hannah Webster b. abt 1639, Ipswich, MA daughter of John Webster b. 1604 in
Suffolk, ENGLAND d. 1646 Ipswich, MA, and Mary Shatswell b. abt 1610,
Ipswich, ENGLAND d. 1694 Newbury, MA. dau of John Shatswell and Judith Unknown.

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MAGNALIA CHRISTI AMERICANA;
or
THE ECCLESIASTICAL HISTORY OF NEW-ENGLAND
by Cotton Mather (1663-1728)
“Now Reproduced from the Edition of 1852
and Published in 1967 by Russell & Russell
A Division of Atheneum House, Inc.”
From: Volume 2, Article XXV, pages 634-636

On March 15, 1697, the savages made a descent upon the skirts of Haverhill, murdering and captivating about thirty-nine persons, and burning about half a dozen houses. In this broil, one Hannah Dustan, having lain in about a week, attended with her nurse, Mary Neff, a body of terrible Indians drew near unto the house where she lay, with designs to carry on their bloody devastations. Her husband hastened from his employments abroad unto the relief of his distressed family; and first bidding seven of his eight children (which were from two to seventeen years of age) to get away as fast as they could unto some garrison in the town, he went in to inform his wife of the horrible distress come upon them. Ere she could get up, the fierce Indians were got so near, that, utterly desparing to do her any service, he ran out after his children; resolving that on the horse which he had with him, he would ride away with that which he should in this extremity find his affections to pitch most upon, and leave the rest unto the care of the Divine Providence. He overtook his children, about forty rod from his door; but then such was the agony of his parental affections, that he found it impossible for him to distinguish any one of them from the rest; wherefore he took up a courageous resolution to live and die with them all. A party of Indians came up with him; and now, though they fired at him, and he fired at them, yet he manfully kept at the reer of his little army of unarmed children, while they marched off with the pace of a child of five years old; until, by the singular providence of God, he arrived safe with them all unto a place of safety about a mile or two from his house. But his house must in the mean time have more dismal tragedies acted at it. The nurse, trying to escape with the new-born infant, fell into the hands of the formidable salvages; and those furious tawnies coming into the house, bid poor Dustan to rise immediately. Full of astonishment, she did so; and sitting down in the chimney with an heart full of most fearful expectation, she saw the raging dragons rifle all that they could carry away, and set the house on fire. About nineteen or twenty Indians now led these away, with about half a score other English captives; but ere they had gone many steps, they dash'd out the brains of the infant against a tree; and several of the other captives, as they began to tire in the sad journey, were soon sent unto their long home; the salvages would presently bury their hatchets in their brains, and leave their carcases on the ground for birds and beasts to feed upon. However, Dustan (with her nurse) notwithstanding her present condition, travelled that night about a dozen miles, and then kept up with their new masters in a long travel of an hundred and fifty miles, more or less, within a few days ensuing, without any sensible damage in their health, from the hardships of their travel, their lodging, their diet, and their many other difficulties.

These two poor women were now in the hands of those whose "tender mercies are cruelties;" but the good God, who hath all "hearts in his own hands," heard the sighs of these prisoners, and gave them to find unexpected favour from the master who hath laid claim unto them. That Indian family consisted of twelve persons; two stout men, three women, and seven children; and for the shame of many an English family, that has the character of prayerless upon it, I must now publish what these poor women assure me. 'Tis this: in obedience to the instructions which the French have given them, they would have prayers in their family no less than thrice every day; in the morning, at noon, and in the evening; nor would they ordinarily let their children eat or sleep, without first saying their prayers. Indeed, these idolaters were, like the rest of their whiter brethren, persecutors, and would not endure that these poor women should retire to their English prayers, if they could hinder them. Nevertheless, the poor women had nothing but fervent prayers to make their lives comfortable or tolerable; and by being daily sent out upon business, they had opportunities, together and asunder, to do like another Hannah, in "pouring out their souls before the Lord." Nor did their praying friends among our selves forbear to "pour out" supplications for them. Now, they could not observe it without some wonder, that their Indian master sometimes when he saw them dejected, would say unto them, "What need you trouble your self? If your God will have you delivered, you shall be so!" And it seems our God would have it so to be. This Indian family was now travelling with these two captive women, (and an English youth taken from Worcester, a year and a half before,) unto a rendezvous of salvages, which they call a town, some where beyond Penacook; and they still told these poor women that when they came to this town, they must be stript, and scourg'd, and run the gantlet through the whole army of Indians. They said this was the fashion when the captives first came to a town; and they derided some of the faint-hearted English, which, they said, fainted and swooned away under the torments of this discipline. But on April 30, while they were yet, it may be, about an hundred and fifty miles from the Indian town, a little before break of day, when the whole crew was in a dead sleep, (reader, see if it prove not so!) one of these women took up a resolution to imitate the action of Gael upon Siberia; and being where she had not her own life secured by any law unto her, she thought she was not forbidden by any law to take away the life of the murderers by whom her child had been butchered. She heartened the nurse and the youth to assist her in this enterprize; and all furnishing themselves with hatchets for the purpose, they struck such home blows upon the heads of their sleeping oppressors, that ere they could any of them struggle into any effectual resistance, "at the feet of these poor prisoners, they bow'd, they fell, they lay down; at their feet they bow'd, they fell; where they bow'd, there they fell down dead." Only one squaw escaped, sorely wounded, from them in the dark; and one boy, whom they reserved asleep, intending to bring him away with them, suddenly waked, and scuttled away from this desolation. But cutting off the scalps of the ten wretches, they came off, and received fifty pounds from the General Assembly of the province, as a recompence of their action; besides which, they received many "presents of congratulation" from their more private friends: but none gave 'em a greater taste of bounty than Colonel Nicholson, The Governour of Maryland, who, hearing of their action, sent 'em a very generous token of his favour.

Sources

  1. Duston/Dustin Family Association,
  2. Stephen R. Myers,
  3. U.S. Sons of the American Revolution Membership Applications, 1889-1970,
  4. Massachusetts, Town and Vital Records, 1620-1988,
  5. U.S. Find A Grave Index, 1600s-Current,

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Lena Bell THURBER

F, #I1, b. 08 June 1897, d. 1989

Family

Marriage 1 : Harold George BARNES m. 03 December 1919 Montpelier, Washington, Vermont, USA, b. 03 July 1893, d. 03 June 1984

  1. Harold Thurber BARNES, b. 27 December 1921, d. 30 January 1967
  2. Erlene Laurinda BARNES, b. 10 February 1924, d. 02 November 2007
  3. Lloyd George BARNES, b. UNKNOWN
  4.    Stillborn BARNES, b. UNKNOWN, d. UNKNOWN

Sources

  1. Holly Barnes Family Tree,
  2. Vermont, Vital Records, 1720-1908,
  3. Vermont, Death Records, 1909-2008,

[TOP]


Harold George BARNES

M, #I2, b. 03 July 1893, d. 03 June 1984

Family

Marriage 1 : Lena Bell THURBER m. 03 December 1919 Montpelier, Washington, Vermont, USA, b. 08 June 1897, d. 1989

  1. Harold Thurber BARNES, b. 27 December 1921, d. 30 January 1967
  2. Erlene Laurinda BARNES, b. 10 February 1924, d. 02 November 2007
  3. Lloyd George BARNES, b. UNKNOWN
  4.    Stillborn BARNES, b. UNKNOWN, d. UNKNOWN

Sources

  1. Holly Barnes Family Tree,
  2. U.S. World War II Draft Registration Cards, 1942,
  3. Vermont, Death Records, 1909-2008,

[TOP]


Harold Thurber BARNES

M, #I3, b. 27 December 1921, d. 30 January 1967

Family

Marriage 1 : Sandra K? BARNES m. UNKNOWN, b. UNKNOWN, d. UNKNOWN

Sources

  1. Holly Barnes Family Tree,
  2. U.S. Find A Grave Index, 1600s-Current,
  3. Texas, Death Certificates, 1903–1982,

[TOP]


Sandra K? BARNES

F, #I4, b. UNKNOWN, d. UNKNOWN

Family

Marriage 1 : Harold Thurber BARNES m. UNKNOWN, b. 27 December 1921, d. 30 January 1967

Sources

  1. Holly Barnes Family Tree,

[TOP]


Erlene Laurinda BARNES

F, #I5, b. 10 February 1924, d. 02 November 2007

Family

Marriage 1 : Willis Chandler BRAGG m. 06 May 1942 Barre, Washington, Vermont, USA, b. 13 November 1922, d. 13 January 2004

  1. William BRAGG, b. 20 July 1943, d. abt. 1995
  2. Reginald BRAGG, b. 14 September 1946

Notes:

Erlene Barnes Bragg
Written by Submitted by Family
Nov 08, 2007 at 10:33 AM
11/08/2007
Erlene Barnes Bragg, 83, of Bragg Hill Road, Fayston, passed away in the comfort of her family on Friday, November 2, 2007. Born in Northfield on February 10, 1924, she was the daughter of the late Harold and Lena (Thurber) Barnes. On May 6, 1942, she married Willis C. Bragg in Barre. Willis predeceased Erlene on January 13, 2004.

Erlene graduated from Stowe High School and, following her marriage, was employed as a clerk for several years at Mehuron's Grocery Store in Waitsfield. Inspired by Emma Ford to get her real estate license, Erlene worked as an independent agent in the Mad River Valley as well as assisted her husband, Willis, in the operation of the family dairy farm on Bragg Hill.

Erlene served the town of Fayston in the House of Representatives from 1959 to 1960. Her memberships included the Fayston Historical Society, the Vermont State and Fayston Republican Parties, served many years on the Fayston School Board and was a member of the Mad River Valley Health Center Board of Directors. In her leisure time, she enjoyed politics, reading and was an avid Bingo player.

Erlene is survived by her son, Reginald B. Bragg, and his wife, Dottie, of Fayston; a daughter-in-law, Lettie Maye Bragg of Rounsaville, GA; seven grandchildren, Richard Bragg and his wife, Cindi, Tricia Jenkins and her husband, Michael, Reginald Bragg Jr. and his wife, Melissa, Amy Gardner, Thad Munson and his wife, LeeAnn, Laura Paquette and her husband, Richard, and Michael Nelson; six great-grandchildren; a brother, Lloyd Barnes of Florida; as well as nieces, nephews and extended family. She was predeceased by a son, Willis C. Bragg Jr., and a brother, Harold Barnes Jr.

Sources

  1. Holly Barnes Family Tree,
  2. 1940 United States Federal Census,
  3. Vermont, Death Records, 1909-2008,

[TOP]


Willis Chandler BRAGG

M, #I6, b. 13 November 1922, d. 13 January 2004

Family

Marriage 1 : Erlene Laurinda BARNES m. 06 May 1942 Barre, Washington, Vermont, USA, b. 10 February 1924, d. 02 November 2007

  1. William BRAGG, b. 20 July 1943, d. abt. 1995
  2. Reginald BRAGG, b. 14 September 1946

Sources

  1. Holly Barnes Family Tree,
  2. Vermont, Birth Records, 1909-2008,
  3. U.S. Social Security Death Index, 1935-2014,
  4. Vermont, Death Records, 1909-2008,

[TOP]


William BRAGG

M, #I7, b. 20 July 1943, d. abt. 1995

Family

Marriage 1 : Lettie May BUTLER m. UNKNOWN, b. 18 April 1943, d. UNKNOWN

  1. Ricky BRAGG, b. 05 August 1967
  2.    Trisha BRAGG, b. 24 December 1969

Sources

  1. Holly Barnes Family Tree,
  2. Vermont, Birth Records, 1909-2008,
  3. U.S. Social Security Death Index, 1935-2014,
  4. Georgia, Death Index, 1919 - 1998,

[TOP]


Reginald BRAGG

M, #I8, b. 14 September 1946

Family

Marriage 1 : Dorothy Ann NELSON m. UNKNOWN, b. UNKNOWN

[TOP]


Lloyd George BARNES

M, #I9, b. UNKNOWN

Family

Marriage 1 : Gertrude Sharon EVERTS m. 1951 Vermont, USA, b. 09 April 1933, d. 01 August 2013

  1. Sharon Lynette BARNES, b. 12 December 1952, d. 26 October 2007
  2. Sandra Lea BARNES, b. UNKNOWN
  3. Robert Lloyd BARNES, b. UNKNOWN
  4. Holly Elizabeth BARNES, b. UNKNOWN

Marriage 2 : Alice Elmyra LOSHBOUGH m. UNKNOWN, b. 09 April 1932

Notes:

b. 03 Jul 1928

Sources

  1. Holly Barnes Family Tree,
  2. Vermont, Birth Records, 1909-2008,

[TOP]


Gertrude Sharon EVERTS

F, #I10, b. 09 April 1933, d. 01 August 2013

Family

Marriage 1 : Lloyd George BARNES m. 1951 Vermont, USA, b. UNKNOWN

  1. Sharon Lynette BARNES, b. 12 December 1952, d. 26 October 2007
  2. Sandra Lea BARNES, b. UNKNOWN
  3. Robert Lloyd BARNES, b. UNKNOWN
  4. Holly Elizabeth BARNES, b. UNKNOWN

Marriage 2 : Benjamin Luke GAYLE m. UNKNOWN, b. 26 November 1926, d. 16 October 2013

Sources

  1. Holly Barnes Family Tree,

[TOP]


Sharon Lynette BARNES

F, #I11, b. 12 December 1952, d. 26 October 2007

Family

Marriage 1 : John OGARA m. UNKNOWN, b. UNKNOWN

Marriage 2 : Tom KING m. UNKNOWN, b. UNKNOWN

Marriage 3 : Jerry JAMES m. UNKNOWN Orange, Vermont, USA, b. UNKNOWN

Sources

  1. Holly Barnes Family Tree,
  2. U.S. Public Records Index, Volume 1,
  3. Web: Obituary Daily Times Index, 1995-Current,

[TOP]


Sandra Lea BARNES

F, #I12, b. UNKNOWN

Family

Marriage 1 : Tom BIGGS m. UNKNOWN, b. Living

  1.    Matthew Thomas BIGGS, b. 04 March 1974

Sources

  1. Holly Barnes Family Tree,
  2. U.S. Public Records Index, Volume 1,

[TOP]


Robert Lloyd BARNES

M, #I13, b. UNKNOWN

Family

Marriage 1 : Sofia OGARA m. UNKNOWN, b. UNKNOWN

Sources

  1. Holly Barnes Family Tree,
  2. U.S. Public Records Index, Volume 1,

[TOP]


Holly Elizabeth BARNES

F, #I14, b. UNKNOWN

Family

Marriage 1 : Wesley Leonard CILLEY m. UNKNOWN Florida, USA, b. 07 December 1942, d. 24 October 2013

  1.    Amber Sharon CILLEY, b. UNKNOWN

Notes:

b. 27 Mar 1961

Sources

  1. U.S. Public Records Index, Volume 1,

[TOP]


Alice Elmyra LOSHBOUGH

F, #I15, b. 09 April 1932

Family

Marriage 1 : Lloyd George BARNES m. UNKNOWN, b. UNKNOWN

Sources

  1. Holly Barnes Family Tree,

[TOP]


Benjamin Luke GAYLE

M, #I16, b. 26 November 1926, d. 16 October 2013

Family

Marriage 1 : Gertrude Sharon EVERTS m. UNKNOWN, b. 09 April 1933, d. 01 August 2013

Sources

  1. Holly Barnes Family Tree,
  2. U.S. Social Security Death Index, 1935-2014,

[TOP]


Stillborn BARNES

F, #I17, b. UNKNOWN, d. UNKNOWN

Sources

  1. Holly Barnes Family Tree,
  2. 1940 United States Federal Census,

[TOP]


Hiram Abel THURBER

M, #I18, b. 1850, d. abt. 1933

Family

Marriage 1 : Lorinda Miles TEMPLE m. UNKNOWN Merrimack, New Hampshire, USA, b. abt. 1859, d. UNKNOWN

  1. Lena Bell THURBER, b. 08 June 1897, d. 1989

Marriage 2 : Flora C. JOHNSON m. 28 April 1881 Boscawen, Merrimack, New Hampshire, USA, b. 24 May 1855, d. 25 August 1889

Sources

  1. Stephen R. Myers,
  2. American Genealogical-Biographical Index (AGBI),
  3. Vermont, Vital Records, 1720-1908,
  4. Vermont, Death Records, 1909-2008,

[TOP]


Lorinda Miles TEMPLE

F, #I19, b. abt. 1859, d. UNKNOWN

Family

Marriage 1 : Hiram Abel THURBER m. UNKNOWN Merrimack, New Hampshire, USA, b. 1850, d. abt. 1933

  1. Lena Bell THURBER, b. 08 June 1897, d. 1989

Sources

  1. Stephen R. Myers,
  2. 1900 United States Federal Census,
  3. Vermont, Vital Records, 1720-1908,

[TOP]


Flora C. JOHNSON

F, #I20, b. 24 May 1855, d. 25 August 1889

Family

Marriage 1 : Hiram Abel THURBER m. 28 April 1881 Boscawen, Merrimack, New Hampshire, USA, b. 1850, d. abt. 1933

Sources

  1. Stephen R. Myers,
  2. Vermont, Vital Records, 1720-1908,

[TOP]


Hiram THURBER

M, #I21, b. 24 March 1803, d. 1879

Family

Marriage 1 : Mary Polly HEATH m. 09 March 1826 Corinth, Orange, Vermont, USA, b. 30 March 1808, d. 08 February 1885

  1. Hiram Abel THURBER, b. 1850, d. abt. 1933

Sources

  1. Stephen R. Myers,

[TOP]


Mary Polly HEATH

F, #I22, b. 30 March 1808, d. 08 February 1885

Family

Marriage 1 : Hiram THURBER m. 09 March 1826 Corinth, Orange, Vermont, USA, b. 24 March 1803, d. 1879

  1. Hiram Abel THURBER, b. 1850, d. abt. 1933

[TOP]


Nathaniel Huntoon THURBER

M, #I23, b. 01 May 1775, d. 01 April 1847

Family

Marriage 1 : Martha YOUNG m. 28 April 1796 Unity, Sullivan, New Hampshire, USA, b. 1767, d. November 1847

  1. Hiram THURBER, b. 24 March 1803, d. 1879
  2. Harris Nathaniel THURBER, b. 29 May 1796, d. 16 September 1884
  3.    Sidney THURBER, b. January 1798
  4.    Eliza THURBER, b. abt. 1800
  5.    Sarah THURBER, b. abt. 1800
  6.    William Darling THURBER, b. 12 December 1813

Notes:

Possibly born in Kingston, NH. There may have been another son and
daughter who died young. Daughter's name may have been Martha D. [Source: Notes by
Kathryn Davitt.]

Sources

  1. Stephen R. Myers,
  2. U.S. Find A Grave Index, 1600s-Current,

[TOP]


Martha YOUNG

F, #I24, b. 1767, d. November 1847

Family

Marriage 1 : Nathaniel Huntoon THURBER m. 28 April 1796 Unity, Sullivan, New Hampshire, USA, b. 01 May 1775, d. 01 April 1847

  1. Hiram THURBER, b. 24 March 1803, d. 1879
  2. Harris Nathaniel THURBER, b. 29 May 1796, d. 16 September 1884
  3.    Sidney THURBER, b. January 1798
  4.    Eliza THURBER, b. abt. 1800
  5.    Sarah THURBER, b. abt. 1800
  6.    William Darling THURBER, b. 12 December 1813

Notes:

[Vital Records filed in the State Dept. of Health, Hazen Drive, Concord,
NH NHVR); Unity Town Records]. Note: Unity town records show "Mrs Patty"
Young, but most Unity marriage records 1782-1796 showing "Mrs" were for
women who had never been previously married. She was B. either in Stratham
[info from son Harris' death certificate [NHVR], or E Unity NH [Thurber
Family Genealogy by A. E. Thurber LDS microfilm #0928330 (TFG)]. Patty
died in Nov 1848. [TFG] Although Corinth was given as her place of death [TFG],
there is no record there of her death.

Martha was Mrs. Martha Young at the time of her marriage to Nathaniel, and
> she went by the name Patty. According to the death certificate of her son
> Harris, she was born in Stratham, NH. The Thurber Family Genealogy by A.
E. Thurber givers her place of birth as East Unity, NH. Although Corinth is
> given as her place of death, there is no record in that town of her death
> occurring there.

Sources

  1. Stephen R. Myers,
  2. Massachusetts, Town and Vital Records, 1620-1988,

[TOP]


Samuel Wilson THURBER

M, #I25, b. 06 May 1752, d. 16 November 1832

Family

Marriage 1 : Sarah Sally HUNTOON m. bef. 1773, b. 11 June 1745, d. 17 March 1815

  1. Nathaniel Huntoon THURBER, b. 01 May 1775, d. 01 April 1847

Marriage 2 : Lydia Melardy POWERS m. 30 November 1815 Croydon, Sullivan, New Hampshire, USA, b. 16 April 1777, d. 19 March 1818

Notes:

Samuel went to NH and settled on a farm in Unity, where the census of 1790
places him as head of a family with three males and three females
including his wife. The census gives his name as Samuel W. His descendants claim
that he was in the last part of the Revolution and was engaged in some part with the Battle of Bunker Hill. They also claim his middle name was Wilson.

From printed records of NH Rev. Rolls; page 30, Vol. II, his name appears
as private on a pay roll in Capt. Uriah Wilcox's Company in Col. Benjamin
Bellow's Regiment of Militia in the state of NH. This regiment went to
reinforce the garrison at Ticonderoga when besieged by the enemy in June
1777. He was engaged 4 June 1777 and discharged 9 July 1777.

[Source: The Thurber Family Genealogy by A. E. Thurber, LDS microfilm #0928330]

[TOP]


Sarah Sally HUNTOON

F, #I26, b. 11 June 1745, d. 17 March 1815

Family

Marriage 1 : Samuel Wilson THURBER m. bef. 1773, b. 06 May 1752, d. 16 November 1832

  1. Nathaniel Huntoon THURBER, b. 01 May 1775, d. 01 April 1847

Notes:

Notes for SALLY HUNTOON:
> Although she went by the name Sally, her given name was Sarah. She d.
> probably in Unity, NH. She is buried in East Unity Cemetery, East Unity,
> NH. Her tombstone is inscribed, "Mrs. Sally Thurber. . . wife of Mr.
> Samuel W. Thurber."

[TOP]


Lydia Melardy POWERS

F, #I27, b. 16 April 1777, d. 19 March 1818

Family

Marriage 1 : Samuel Wilson THURBER m. 30 November 1815 Croydon, Sullivan, New Hampshire, USA, b. 06 May 1752, d. 16 November 1832

Notes:

Notes for LYDIA MELARDY:
Lydia's surname appears also as Melledia or Melandy. It is not known when
she died or where she is buried.

[TOP]


Benjamin THURBER

M, #I28, b. abt. 1720, d. 1807

Family

Marriage 1 : Elizabeth HALLETT m. 01 November 1747 Warren, Bristol, Rhode Island, USA, b. abt. 1725, d. 11 June 1806

  1. Samuel Wilson THURBER, b. 06 May 1752, d. 16 November 1832
  2. Borden THURBER, b. 20 October 1748, d. UNKNOWN
  3.    Hannah THURBER, b. 30 April 1750, d. 13 October 1797
  4.    Elizabeth THURBER, b. 02 April 1755, d. UNKNOWN
  5.    Benjamin THURBER, b. 01 April 1756, d. 25 December 1852
  6. Philena Matilda THURBER, b. 20 August 1759, d. 21 December 1841
  7.    Francis THURBER, b. 10 April 1763, d. UNKNOWN
  8.    Isaac THURBER, b. 27 January 1768, d. UNKNOWN

Notes:

Sources and Notes for Benjamin and Elizabeth (Hallett) Thurber*

Notes:

Concerning Benjamin1 Thurber, Kathryn writes, "It should be noted that there is a span
of time when it is difficult to determine which Benjamin Thurber is the one mentioned in certain land deeds. It is difficult, in fact, to determine if the deeds refer to one man or two. The "other" Benjamin Thurber is the son of Samuel and Rachel (Wheeler) Thurber who was born 14 July 1734 in Providence, Prov. Co., RI. He m. Phebe Dyer, b. 12 Oct 1736 possibly in Cranston, RI. (They m. 30 Dec 1756 in Cranston). He d. 25 Apr 1807 & she d. 20 Sept. 1818. He had 2 children.

May 1756 - a Benjamin Thurber of Providence signed a paper that he has "taken the oath or affirmation, prescribed by the colony law, against bribery and corruption, in the election of officers in this government." Source #44.

Benjamin Thurber .....Falmouth 1760 Source #30

The town of Sackville in New Brunswick, Canada, was settled by 25 families in the summer of 1761 represented by Benjamin Thurber from Providence, RI. Source #21.

On 20 April 1762, Benjamin sells Farm lot #43 - 55 acres to Joseph Jess. Grant was made by Gov. Laurence's Proclamation of 1758 in relation to the vacated lands on Bay of Fundy, NS. Source #26.

(Explanation) "Then comes consideration of the settlements sparked by Gov. Lawrence's proclamation of 1758, Which invited Protestant settlers to fill up the land formerly in possession of the French, and promised 100 acres to every person master or mistress of a family, with 50 acres for every white or black man, woman or child, no one person to have more than 1000 acres by grant in his own name." Source #30.

This Ben was granted 500 acres of land in Falmouth, Nova Scotia on 19 Feb 1764. No specific lots mentioned. Source #24.

This Ben of Windsor, Halifax Co., NS, yeoman sold one 6 acre lot #18 in Falmouth to David Shaw in Falmouth on 27 Feb 1765. Sources #25 and #28.

This Ben of Windsor, Halifax Co., NS, binds himself to David Shaw on 22 Feb 1765 for 100 pounds. Source #28.

21 July ____ granted 3 lots in Falmouth, NS - granted Town lot A, No. 4 in Falmouth. Source #29.

31 Oct 1765, Benjamin Thurber of Falmouth, Kings Co., NS, sold town lot A4 in 2d division. His wife, Elizabeth, is mentioned. Source#31.

*From the Thurber Genealogical Index (1995) by Joanne E. Martin based on research of Kathryn Davitt.
5 Nov 1765 Ben Thurber of Falmouth, NS, wants to obtain license to alienate land in Falmouth (Farm lot No. 43, Dyke lot No. 29, Town lot in 2nd Div., Letter A, No. 4).

19 Feb 1766 Ben granted land in Falmouth, NS. Source #29.

On 7 Dec 1770 John Wendell of Portsmouth, Prov. of NH, sold to Ben & Elizabeth. Thurber of Saville, Prov. of NH, Yeoman, 25 acres of land in Saville. Source #42.

7 Dec 1770, John Wendell of Portsmouth, Province of NH, sold to Ben and Eliza. Thurber of Saville, Province of NH, Yeoman, 25. acres of land in Saville. Source#42.

15 March 1776 Ben was a First Lieutenant in Col. Benjamin Bellows, Jr.'s regiment. Sources #43 and #51.

Benjamin was a selectman of Saville. Source #43.

15 July 1776 Benjamin and his son, Samuel Wilson, both of Saville/Sunapee signed the Association test, indicating their support of the Revolutionary War. Source #44.

5 Dec 1776 Benjamin was appointed adjutant of Col. David Gilman's regiment. Sources #45 and #50.

The family removed to Hopkinton, NH between 5 Dec 1776 and March 1777.

March 1777, Benjamin lived in Hopkinton, Hillsborough County, NH and was in Capt. Joshua Bailey's Co., Col. Seely's Rgmt. of NH State Troops. Source #22.

August 1777 Benjamin was in Bennington Battle. Source #22.

23 Jun 1779 Ben mentioned in town records concerning building a bridge by his property. Source #46.

29 Apr 1782 - a Ben Thurber of Charlestown, NH, gentleman bought 50 acres of land in Charlestown.

22 May 1783 - a Ben Thurber of Charlestown, Co. Cheshire, NH, gentleman, sold 50 acres of land.

1787 Ben on Constable Gressy's Hopkinton Tax List for 1787. Source #46.

In 1790 Ben lived in Warnertown, Hillsborough Co., NH. Source #47.

29 Aug 1799, a Benjamin Thurber witnessed two land deed of Nathaniel3 Thurber (Samuel Wilson2, Benjamin 1). This could be Benjamin1 who m. Elizabeth Hallet or his grandson Benjamin3, who m. Mary Graves. Source #48.

There is no Benjamin Thurber living in the 1800 Federal Census as the head of the household in NH or VT. It is possible that Ben and his wife, Elizabeth, moved to VT when their daughter and husband, Francis and Philena Matilda (Thurber) Davis moved. The Davis's moved in the fall of 1794.

In the 1800 Federal Census, Barnard, Windsor Co., VT, there were an elderly man and woman living with the Davis's. Since his father was dead by then, it is possible that Francis Davis had his in-laws living with them. Source #52.

On I I June 1806 Elizabeth Thurber died in Royalton, Vermont, at age 84 and is buried in Royalton Broad Brook. Source #49.

Benjamin died in 1807. Source #1.
Sources for Benjamin and Elizabeth (Hallett) Thurber

1. Genealogy of the Ancestry and Descendants of Captain Francis Davis, by Francis Y. Davis, P. 104,105, 109, 111.

2. Vital Records of Rhode Island, 1636-1850, First Series, Vol. 6, Bristol County, P. 38.

3. Civil Register for Falmouth Township, Hants County, Nova Scotia (1747-1825) Mg. 9 B95, Vol. 2, P. 8-9. p. 4 of typescript copy, reel c-3027.

4. The Thurber Family Genealogy, by A.E. Thurber, Card # Sect. 2- 1.

5. New England Vital Records from the Exeter News-Letter (1831-1840), Vol. 2, by Scott Lee Chipman, p. 61.

6. Vital Records of Kingston, NE, 1681-1823, p. 69.

7. The Huntoon Family, by Daniel Huntoon, pp. 27,34.

8. Copied from tombstone in E. Unity cemetery, E. Unity, NH.

9. A Genealogical Record of the Power(s) Families, by Franklin E. Powers, p. 8.

10. The Thurber Family Genealogy, by A. E. Thurber, Card 1 for Benjamin Thurber.

11. Pedigree chart for Harold B. Thurber.

12. According to Sons of the American Revolution, application of Seymour Warrin Thurber.

13. Letter from Oakwood Cemetery Association, Brentwood Rd, P.O. Box 409 P, Bay Shore, NY 11706, to Harold B. Thurber, dated 27 April 1990.

14. Letter from Harold Ruland to Mr. Thurber, dated 23 Nov 1955.

15. 1850 Federal Census, NY, Suffolk Co., Islip, Series M432, Roll 601, p. 113.

16. 1870 Federal Census, NY, Suffolk Co., Islip, Series M593, Roll 1101, stamped p. 44, handwritten p. 87, line 4.

17. Letter from Harold B. Thurber to Charles H. Thurber, Sr., stating information from tombstones he copied while at an old cemetery at Bay Shore, L.I., NY.

18. Warner, NH, Town Records on microfilm at the NH State Library, Concord, NH, Vol: 1, p. 457.

19. Old Families of Salisbury and Amesbury, by David W. Hoyt, p. 73 1.

20. Vital Records of Amesbury, MA, p. 332.

21. Rhode Island Genealogical Register. Oct. 1980, p. 146.

22. Revolutionary War Pension and Bounty and Land Warrant Application Files, National Archives Film M804-2385, Application #RI0580 for Francis Thurber.

23. Records sent by Joyce J. Denny, Genealogy Chairperson of the Franklin Co. Historical and Museum Society, believed to be the records of the Bunker Hill Cemetery, Franklin Co., NY.

24. Township Grants Call No. o/5 211, Public Archives of NS.

25. Public Archives of NS, MG 1, Vol. 860, Shaw, Folder 2, No. 31.

26. A letter to Mr. Thurber (pr. Harold B.) dated May 10, 1969, first page only and unsigned.

27. Records of the Colony of RI, by John R. Bartlett, Vol. 5, p. 487.

28. Public Archives of Nova Scotia, Call No. MG 1, Vol. 806, Folder 1, No. 5.

29. Public Archives of Nova Scotia, Call No., Pans o/s, 501.

30. Planters and Pioneers, by Esther Clark Wright, pp. 7, 268.

31. Public Archives of Nova Scotia, Call No. MG1, Vol. 806, Folder 1. No. 7.

32. 1790 Federal Census, NH, Hillsborough County, Warnerstown, p. 56, Col. 3, in printed book.

33. Records sent by Joyce J. Denny, Genealogy Chairperson of the Franklin Co., Historical and Museum Society, believed to be the records of the Bunker Hill Cem. Franklin Co., NY.

34. According to Georgie Thurber, 10535 N.W. Walters Lane, Portland, OR 97229.

35. According to Dennis Roth, 8535 136th Ave., S.E, Renton, WA 98059.

36. Letter from Arnold Foote to Georgie Thurber, dated 22 Jan 1991, p.1, quoting microfilm reel 1430774, LDS Church File, Congregationalist Church Records, Baptisms/Marriages/Deaths, 1835-1879, Shipton/Danville/Mellbourne, Richmond Co., P.Q.

37. The Thurber Family Genealogy by A.E. Thurber, Card 1 for Isaac Thurber, LDS filmstrip #0928330.

38. Unity, NH, Town Records, Vol. 1, p. 640.

39. Marriage record in Unity Town Records, Microfilm, p. 630 of Vol. 1.

40. Will of Nathaniel Huntoon filed in Cheshire Co. Courthouse, Keene, NH.

41. Enclosed with probate of Capt. Nathaniel Huntoon filed in Cheshire Courthouse, Keene, NH, under heading "Paid to the Reil and personal Estate of Capt Nathl Huntoon."
42. N.H. Province Deeds, filed in NH, State Archives, Land Deed Records, Vol. 80, p. 330.

43. The Story of Sunapee, NH, pp. 27-29.

44. New Hampshire 1776 Census, by Jay Mack Holbrook, p. 145.

45. History of Goshen, NH, p. 109.

46. Hopkintown Town Records, Vol. 2, pp. 196, 199, 201, 203, 205, 206, 207.

47. 1790 Federal Census, NH, Hillsborough. Co.. Warnertown, p. 56, 3rd col. of printed index.

48. Cheshire Co., NH, land deeds, Book 45, p. 540 and Book 40, p. 313.

49. Death record for Elizabeth Thurber filed in Vermont Vital Records, Montpelier, VT.

50. NH State Papers, Vol. 14, p. 435.

51. NH State Papers, Vol. 14, p. 298.

52. 1800 Federal Census Vermont, Windsor Co., Barnard, p. 82.

53. According to Joanne Flores Lochirco as sent to Thurber Clearing House. This entry is not one sent by Kathryn Davitt. It was added by Joanne E. Martin.

Sources

  1. American Genealogical-Biographical Index (AGBI),
  2. Stephen R. Myers,

[TOP]


Elizabeth HALLETT

F, #I29, b. abt. 1725, d. 11 June 1806

Family

Marriage 1 : Benjamin THURBER m. 01 November 1747 Warren, Bristol, Rhode Island, USA, b. abt. 1720, d. 1807

  1. Samuel Wilson THURBER, b. 06 May 1752, d. 16 November 1832
  2. Borden THURBER, b. 20 October 1748, d. UNKNOWN
  3.    Hannah THURBER, b. 30 April 1750, d. 13 October 1797
  4.    Elizabeth THURBER, b. 02 April 1755, d. UNKNOWN
  5.    Benjamin THURBER, b. 01 April 1756, d. 25 December 1852
  6. Philena Matilda THURBER, b. 20 August 1759, d. 21 December 1841
  7.    Francis THURBER, b. 10 April 1763, d. UNKNOWN
  8.    Isaac THURBER, b. 27 January 1768, d. UNKNOWN

Notes:

Elizabeth Hallett, Wife of Benjamin Thurber

Her likely connection to the Annable, Dexter, Gorham, and Halett families of Barnstable, Cape Cod, Massachusetts

Draft - Not Finished - Prepared by Edward Gerrish Mair
August, 1998

Elizabeth Hallett, Wife of Benjamin ThurberElizabeth Hallett, Wife of Benjamin Thurber

abstract

This report suggests, although it does not prove, that Elizabeth Hallett who married Benjamin Thurber in Warren, Bristol County, Rhode Island on 1 Nov. 1747 is the daughter of David Hallett and Mary Annable who was born January 9, 1725/26 in Barnstable, Barnstable County, Massachusetts.
The Annable, Dexter, Gorham, and Hallett families of Barnstable are closely connected through several marriages. Members of the Dexter, Gorham, and Hallett families migrated to Bristol and Warren in Rhode Island in the early 18th century. Within a few generations the Dexter, Gorham, and Thurber families of Rhode Island became linked through several marriages.
Of the several Elisabeth Halletts of the right age, two died in infancy and another is recorded as having married Prince Hawes. The Elisabeth born January 9 is the only Elisabeth Hallett who might have married Benjamin Thurber. We might speculate that she traveled to Bristol County Rhode Island to help care for the children of one of her cousins where she met and married Benjamin Thurber.
SourcesSources

Barnstable Vital Records
IGI Microfiche for Rhode Island
IGI Microfiche for Massachusetts
Genealogical Notes of Barnstable Families,
revised by C.F. Swift, Vol. I, The Patriot Press, 1888

Bates Collection,
Rhode Island Historical Society Microfilm, Vol. XII, p. 24

The Anable Family in America 1623 - 1967
by Anthony Anable, Privately Printed, Stamford, CT., 1967

"Notes on the Gorham Family", NEHGR, April 1900

The Hallett Family of Yarmouth,
by C.F. Swift, The Register Press, Yarmouthport, MA, 1912

KINSHIP of Elizabeth HallettKINSHIP of Elizabeth Hallett

Name Birth date Relationship with Elizabeth Hallett

ANNABLEANNABLE

first generation

Annable, Anthony1 2nd great-grandfather (24)

second generation second generation

Annable, Samuel2 February 08, 1645/46 Great-grandfather (12)

third generation third generation

Annable, John3 July 19, 1673 Grandfather (6)
Annable, Samuel3 July 14, 1669 Grand Uncle

fourth generation fourth generation

Annable, Mary4 December 1701 Mother (3)
married David Hallett4 (2)
Annable, Mehitable4 September 28, 1695 Aunt
married Andrew Hallett4
Annable, Cornelius4 November 03, 1704 Uncle
Annable, Thomas4 June 21, 1708 first cousin once removed
married Ann Gorham4

In the Genealogical notes of Barnstable Families from the Amos Otis Papers, revised by C.F. Swift and reprinted in 188 we learn that after the fourth generation most of the Annable family vanished from Barnstable: "In 1703 there were only two of the family, Samuel and John, in Barnstable entitled to share in the common lands."

DEXTERDEXTER

first generation first generation

Dexter, Thomas1 2nd great-grandfather (20)

second generation second generation

Dexter, Thomas2 1625 Great-grandfather (10)

third generation third generation

Dexter, Abigail3 June 12, 1663 Grandmother (5)
married Jonathan Hallett3 (4)
Sister of John3
Dau of Thomas2 (10)
Dexter, Elizabeth3 September 21, 1651 Grandaunt
Dexter, Thomas3 Abt. 1653 Granduncle
*Dexter, John3 1660 Granduncle
Son of Thomas2
brother of Abigail3
marMehetabeltable Hallett3
moved to Portsmouth RI by 1717

fourth generation fourth generation

Dexter, Elizabeth4 November 02, 1683 1st cousin once removed
Dexter, Thomas4 August 26, 1686 1st cousin once removed
Dexter, Abigail4 May 26, 1689 1st cousin once removed
*Dexter, John4 September 11, 1692 1st cousin once removed

f gefifthfifth fifthfifth generation

Dexter, Mehitable5 Wife of Samuel Thurber5
Mother of Amey Thurber6

GORHAMGORHAM

second generationsecond generation

Gorham, Desire2 Sister of Jabez2 and Elisabeth2
Wife of the uncle John Hawes?
Gorham, Elizabeth2 Apr 23, 1648 Wife of the great-granduncle
Sister of Jabez2 and Desire2
Wife of ?
Daughter of Jabez5
*Gorham, Jabez2 Brother of Elizabeth2 and Desire2
ancestor of RI Gorhams

fifth generationfifth generation

Gorham, Issac5 Husband of the 2nd cousin
married Mary Hallett5
*Gorham, Jabez5 Father of Hannah6
Gorham, Josiah5 Husband of the 2nd cousin
married Hannah Hallett5
Gorham, Lydia5 Wife of the 1st cousin
married Moses Hallett
Gorham, Samuel5 Husband of the 2nd cousin
married Abigail Hallett5

sixth generationsixth generation

Gorham, Hannah6 Wife of Dexter Thurber
Gorham, Jabez6 Son of Jabez5
Brother of Hannah6
Father of John8
Husband of Amey Thurber6

eighth generationeighth generation

Gorham, John8 Son of Jabez6
Husband of Amey Thurber8

HALLETTHALLETT

first generationfirst generation

Hallett, Andrew1 2nd great-grandfather (16)

second generationsecond generation

Hallett, Andrew2 Abt. 1615 Great-grandfather (8)

third generationthird generation

Hallett, Jonathan3 November 20, 1647 Grandfather (4)
married Abigail Dexter3 (5)
brother of Mehitable3
*Hallett, Mehitable3 Grandaunt

John Dexter3; moved to Portsmouth RI
sister of Jonathan3
Hallett, Ruhama3 Grandaunt

fourth generationfourth generation

Hallet, Andrew4 married Mehitable Annable4
Hallett, David4 Father (2)
married Mary Annable4
Hallett, John4 1688 1st cousin once removed
Hallett, Thomas4 1691 Uncle
married Desire Gorham4
Hallett, Timothy4 Uncle
Hallett, Mehitable4 Aunt
Hallett, Joseph4 1st cousin once removed

fifth generationfifth generation

Hallett, Abigail5 June 22, 1720 Sister
Hallett, Abner5 May 19, 1741 Brother
Hallett, Annah5 May 14, 1737 Sister
Hallett, David5 December 12, 1724 Brother
Hallett, Elisabeth5 June 12, 1727 1st cousin
dau Timothy4 and Patience
died as infant
Hallett, Elisabeth5 April 25, 1734 2nd cousin
dau of Joseph Hallett & Abigail
married Prince Hawes
Hallett, Elisabeth5 November 16, 1735 1st cousin
dau of Timothy4 and Patience
died as infant
Hallett, Elizabeth5 January 09, 1725/26 Self
dau of David Hallett4 and Mary Annable4
married Benjamin Thurber?
Hallett, Hannah5 October 25, 1729 2nd cousin
married Josiah Gorham5
Husband of the 1st cousin
Hallett, John5 August 09, 1719 2nd cousin
Hallett, Jonathan5 December 01, 1722 Brother
Hallett, Mary5 2nd cousin
married Issac Gorham
Hallett, Mary5 May 11, 1739 Sister
Hallett, Mehitable5 April 21, 1729 Sister
Hallett, Moses5 April 20, 1729 1st cousin
Hallett, Rebeca5 July 19, 1723 1st cousin
Wife of the 2nd cousin
Hallett, Remember5 May 12, 1731 Sister
Hallett, Sarah5 May 28, 1733 Sister

ThurberThurber
fifth generationfifth generation

Thurber, Benjamin5 Husband

sixth generationsixth generation

Thurber, Amey6 Wife of Jabez Gorham6
Dau. Of Mehitable Dexter5
Thurber, Issac6 Father of Amey7

seventh generationseventh generation

Thurber, Amey7 Wife of John Gorham7
Dau of Issac Thurber6
Twin of Amey6

Sources

  1. American Genealogical-Biographical Index (AGBI),
  2. Vermont, Vital Records, 1720-1908,
  3. U.S. Find A Grave Index, 1600s-Current,

[TOP]


Tom KING

M, #I30, b. UNKNOWN

Family

Marriage 1 : Sharon Lynette BARNES m. UNKNOWN, b. 12 December 1952, d. 26 October 2007

Sources

  1. Stephen R. Myers,

[TOP]


Jerry JAMES

M, #I31, b. UNKNOWN

Family

Marriage 1 : Sharon Lynette BARNES m. UNKNOWN Orange, Vermont, USA, b. 12 December 1952, d. 26 October 2007

Sources

  1. Holly Barnes Family Tree,

[TOP]


John OGARA

M, #I32, b. UNKNOWN

Family

Marriage 1 : Sharon Lynette BARNES m. UNKNOWN, b. 12 December 1952, d. 26 October 2007

Sources

  1. Holly Barnes Family Tree,

[TOP]


Tom BIGGS

M, #I33, b. Living

Family

Marriage 1 : Sandra Lea BARNES m. UNKNOWN, b. UNKNOWN

  1.    Matthew Thomas BIGGS, b. 04 March 1974

Sources

  1. Holly Barnes Family Tree,

[TOP]


Matthew Thomas BIGGS

M, #I34, b. 04 March 1974

Sources

  1. Holly Barnes Family Tree,
  2. U.S. Public Records Index, Volume 1,

[TOP]


Wesley Leonard CILLEY

M, #I35, b. 07 December 1942, d. 24 October 2013

Family

Marriage 1 : Holly Elizabeth BARNES m. UNKNOWN Florida, USA, b. UNKNOWN

  1.    Amber Sharon CILLEY, b. UNKNOWN

Sources

  1. U.S. Public Records Index, Volume 1,
  2. Holly Barnes Family Tree,
  3. U.S. Social Security Death Index, 1935-2014,

[TOP]


Amber Sharon CILLEY

F, #I36, b. UNKNOWN

Notes:

b.

Sources

  1. Stephen R. Myers,

[TOP]


Laura Hamlin BARNES

F, #I37, b. 10 March 1883, d. 1983

Family

Marriage 1 : Clyde Bailey WORTHEN m. UNKNOWN Washington, Vermont, USA, b. 23 May 1888, d. 1965

  1.    Ruth Myrtle WORTHEN, b. 29 December 1913, d. 06 February 1916
  2.    George Barnes WORTHEN, b. 26 September 1914, d. UNKNOWN
  3.    Clyde Bailey WORTHEN, b. 06 March 1919, d. 24 May 1919
  4.    John Brighton WORTHEN, b. 18 September 1919, d. 19 February 1932

Sources

  1. U.S. City Directories, 1821-1989,
  2. 1940 United States Federal Census,
  3. U.S. Social Security Death Index, 1935-2014,

[TOP]


Harris Nathaniel THURBER

M, #I38, b. 29 May 1796, d. 16 September 1884

Family

Marriage 1 : Leah HEATH m. 13 September 1821 Corinth, Orange, Vermont, USA, b. 14 May 1804, d. 16 June 1897

  1. Nathaniel Huntoon THURBER, b. 22 February 1837, d. 1920
  2. Martha Ann THURBER, b. 12 June 1827, d. 21 September 1899
  3.    Mary Eliza THURBER, b. 17 June 1834
  4.    Henrietta Maria THURBER, b. 26 November 1839
  5.    Elvira Wright THURBER, b. 1842
  6.    Lucy Ann THURBER, b. 22 June 1844

Notes:

Both Harris and Leah are buried in the East Unity Cemetery, East Unity, NH.

Sources

  1. Stephen R. Myers,
  2. U.S. Find A Grave Index, 1600s-Current,

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Leah HEATH

F, #I39, b. 14 May 1804, d. 16 June 1897

Family

Marriage 1 : Harris Nathaniel THURBER m. 13 September 1821 Corinth, Orange, Vermont, USA, b. 29 May 1796, d. 16 September 1884

  1. Nathaniel Huntoon THURBER, b. 22 February 1837, d. 1920
  2. Martha Ann THURBER, b. 12 June 1827, d. 21 September 1899
  3.    Mary Eliza THURBER, b. 17 June 1834
  4.    Henrietta Maria THURBER, b. 26 November 1839
  5.    Elvira Wright THURBER, b. 1842
  6.    Lucy Ann THURBER, b. 22 June 1844

Sources

  1. Stephen R. Myers,
  2. Vermont, Vital Records, 1720-1908,
  3. New Hampshire, Death and Disinterment Records, 1654-1949,

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Nathaniel Huntoon THURBER

M, #I40, b. 22 February 1837, d. 1920

Family

Marriage 1 : Madelia Leah EASTMAN m. 15 September 1862 Corinth, Orange, Vermont, USA, b. 19 December 1840, d. 19 April 1891

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Madelia Leah EASTMAN

F, #I41, b. 19 December 1840, d. 19 April 1891

Family

Marriage 1 : Nathaniel Huntoon THURBER m. 15 September 1862 Corinth, Orange, Vermont, USA, b. 22 February 1837, d. 1920

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Martha Ann THURBER

F, #I42, b. 12 June 1827, d. 21 September 1899

Family

Marriage 1 : Joseph Heath EASTMAN m. 03 May 1853 Unity, Sullivan, New Hampshire, USA, b. 26 November 1830, d. UNKNOWN

  1.    Emma J. EASTMAN, b. bet. 1853 and 1856, d. UNKNOWN
  2.    Joseph H. EASTMAN, b. bet. 1855 and 1856, d. UNKNOWN
  3. Abbie Etta EASTMAN, b. 02 June 1857, d. abt. 1906

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Joseph Heath EASTMAN

M, #I43, b. 26 November 1830, d. UNKNOWN

Family

Marriage 1 : Martha Ann THURBER m. 03 May 1853 Unity, Sullivan, New Hampshire, USA, b. 12 June 1827, d. 21 September 1899

  1.    Emma J. EASTMAN, b. bet. 1853 and 1856, d. UNKNOWN
  2.    Joseph H. EASTMAN, b. bet. 1855 and 1856, d. UNKNOWN
  3. Abbie Etta EASTMAN, b. 02 June 1857, d. abt. 1906

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Emma J. EASTMAN

F, #I44, b. bet. 1853 and 1856, d. UNKNOWN

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Joseph H. EASTMAN

M, #I45, b. bet. 1855 and 1856, d. UNKNOWN

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Abbie Etta EASTMAN

F, #I46, b. 02 June 1857, d. abt. 1906

Family

Marriage 1 : Elmer F.MORRILL m. UNKNOWN New Hampshire, USA, b. abt. 1840, d. UNKNOWN

Sources

  1. Stephen R. Myers,
  2. 1870 United States Federal Census,
  3. New Hampshire, Death and Burial Records Index, 1654-1949,

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Elmer F.MORRILL

M, #I47, b. abt. 1840, d. UNKNOWN

Family

Marriage 1 : Abbie Etta EASTMAN m. UNKNOWN New Hampshire, USA, b. 02 June 1857, d. abt. 1906

Sources

  1. Stephen R. Myers,

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Jesse F. EASTMAN

M, #I48, b. 1801, d. 07 October 1920

Family

Marriage 1 : Lorinda HEATH , b. 28 April 1810, d. 19 April 1891

  1. Madelia Leah EASTMAN, b. 19 December 1840, d. 19 April 1891
  2. Joseph Heath EASTMAN, b. 26 November 1830, d. UNKNOWN

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Lorinda HEATH

F, #I49, b. 28 April 1810, d. 19 April 1891

Family

Marriage 1 : Jesse F. EASTMAN , b. 1801, d. 07 October 1920

  1. Madelia Leah EASTMAN, b. 19 December 1840, d. 19 April 1891
  2. Joseph Heath EASTMAN, b. 26 November 1830, d. UNKNOWN

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