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Edmund Duke of York LANGLEY

M, #I965, b. 05 June 1341, d. 01 August 1402

Family

Marriage 1 : Isabella of CASTILE m. aft. 01 January 1372 Hertfordshire, England, b. 1355, d. 23 November 1393

  1. Richard Duke of YORK, b. September 1376, d. 05 August 1415
  2. Constance of York LANGLEY, b. 1374, d. 29 November 1416

Sources

  1. Stephen R. Myers,
  2. Web: Netherlands, GenealogieOnline Trees Index, 1000-Current (in Dutch),
  3. U.K. and Ireland, Find A Grave Index, 1300s-Current,

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Isabella of CASTILE

F, #I966, b. 1355, d. 23 November 1393

Family

Marriage 1 : Edmund Duke of York LANGLEY m. aft. 01 January 1372 Hertfordshire, England, b. 05 June 1341, d. 01 August 1402

  1. Richard Duke of YORK, b. September 1376, d. 05 August 1415
  2. Constance of York LANGLEY, b. 1374, d. 29 November 1416

Sources

  1. Stephen R. Myers,

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Constance of York LANGLEY

F, #I967, b. 1374, d. 29 November 1416

Family

Marriage 1 : Earl of Kent Edmund HOLLAND , b. abt. 1350, d. 25 April 1397

Sources

  1. Stephen R. Myers,

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Earl of Kent Edmund HOLLAND

M, #I968, b. abt. 1350, d. 25 April 1397

Family

Marriage 1 : Constance of York LANGLEY , b. 1374, d. 29 November 1416

Sources

  1. Stephen R. Myers,

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Edward III King of ENGLAND

M, #I969, b. 13 November 1312, d. 21 June 1377

Family

Marriage 1 : Philippa of HAINAULT m. 24 January 1327 Yorkshire, England, b. 24 June 1311, d. 15 August 1369

  1. Edmund Duke of York LANGLEY, b. 05 June 1341, d. 01 August 1402
  2. Edward The Black Prince PLANTAGENET, b. 15 June 1330, d. 08 June 1376
  3. Lionel Duke of Clarence PLANTAGENET, b. 29 November 1338, d. 17 October 1368
  4.    Duke of Lancaster John of GAUNT, b. March 1339, d. 1399
  5. Thomas Earl of Buckingham PLANTAGENET, b. 07 JAN 1354/55, d. 08 September 1397

Notes:

[Myers.ftw]

King of England, eldest son of Edward II. and Isabella of France, was born at Windsor in 1312, and succeeded to the throne, on the deposition of his father, in 1327. Although a regency was appointed, the chief power was held by the queen and her paramour, Roger Mortimer, Earl of March. In 1328 Edward was married to Philippa, daughter of William III., Count of Holland and Hainault, and two years later he assumed the government, had Mortimer seized and hanged, and imprisoned Queen Isabella. In 1333 Edward invaded Scotland, which had been nominally subjected to England by Edward Baliol; besieged Berwick, and defeated the regent at Halidon Hill. The greater war with France soon withdrew his attention from Scotland. He assumed the title of king of France, invaded the country from Flanders, but without any successful result, renewed the invasion in 1340, when he defeated the French fleet at Sluys, besieged Tournay, and concluded a truce. The war was renewed and another truce made in 1348, to be broken the following year.

In 1846 he won the great victory of Crecy, took Calais in 1347, and concluded another truce. During Edward's absence in France the Scots invaded England, and were defeated at Nevil's Cross, David II. being taken prisoner. Edward aimed at the acquisition of Flanders, hoped to get his son Edward, the Black Prince, made Earl of Flanders by the aid of Philip van Arteveldt and the free towns; but Philip was murdered in an insurrection at Ghent. In 1356 Edward, the Black Prince, invaded France, and gained the victory of Poitiers, taking the French king and his son
prisoners. The king was released after four years on the conclusion of the peace of Bretigny. David of Scotland was released for a heavy ransom in 1357. War broke out again with France in 1369, and in 1378 John of Gaunt marched without resistance from Calais to Bordeaux. The long wars of Edward III., though almost fruitless of practical result, appear to have been popular; and his numerous parliaments granted liberal supplies for carrying them on, gaining in return confirmations of the Great and other charters, and many valuable concessions. His victories raised the spirit and also the fame of his country, and with the evident military power of England grew also her commerce and manufactures. In this reign Wickliffe began his assault on the church
of Rome; the order of the Garter was instituted, and the Round Tower at Windsor was hastily built by command of the king, to receive the round table for the new knights (1344): cannon began to be used in war; and the first English gold coin was struck. Edward died at Shene, now Richmond, June 21, 1377. By his queen Philippa, he had six sons and five daughters. [See Perrers, Alice.]

Sources

  1. Stephen R. Myers,

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Philippa of HAINAULT

F, #I970, b. 24 June 1311, d. 15 August 1369

Family

Marriage 1 : Edward III King of ENGLAND m. 24 January 1327 Yorkshire, England, b. 13 November 1312, d. 21 June 1377

  1. Edmund Duke of York LANGLEY, b. 05 June 1341, d. 01 August 1402
  2. Edward The Black Prince PLANTAGENET, b. 15 June 1330, d. 08 June 1376
  3. Lionel Duke of Clarence PLANTAGENET, b. 29 November 1338, d. 17 October 1368
  4.    Duke of Lancaster John of GAUNT, b. March 1339, d. 1399
  5. Thomas Earl of Buckingham PLANTAGENET, b. 07 JAN 1354/55, d. 08 September 1397

Notes:

Philippa was the daughter of William of Hainault, a lord in part of what is now Belgium. When she was nine the King of England, Edward II, decided that he would marry his son, the future Edward III, to her, and sent one of his bishops, a Bishop Stapeldon, to look at her. He described her thus:

"The lady whom we saw has not uncomely hair, betwixt blue-black and brown. Her head is cleaned shaped; her forehead high and broad, and standing somewhat forward. Her face narrows between the eyes, and the lower part of her face is still more narrow and slender than the forehead. Her eyes are blackish brown and deep. Her nose is fairly smooth and even, save that is somewhat broad at the tip and flattened, yet it is no snub nose. Her nostrils are also broad, her mouth fairly wide. Her lips somewhat full and especially the lower lip…all her limbs are well set and unmaimed, and nought is amiss so far as a man may see. Moreover, she is brown of skin all over, and much like her father, and in all things she is pleasant enough, as it seems to us."

Four years later Prince Edward went to visit his bride-to-be and her family, and fell in live with her. She was betrothed to him and in 1327, when she was only 14, she arrived in England. The next year, when she was 15, they married and were crowned King and Queen in 1330 when she was heavily pregnant with her first child and only 17.

This first child was called Edward, like his father, but is better known as the Black Prince. Many say that he was called this because of the colour of his armour, but there are records that show that he was called 'black' when he was very small. The French called him 'Le Noir'.

Philippa was a remarkable woman. She was very wise and was known and loved by the English for her kindliness and restraint. She would travel with her husband on his campaigns and take her children as well. When the King was abroad she ruled in his absence. Queen's College in Oxford University was founded under her direction by her chaplain, Robert de Eglesfield in 1341 when she was 28. She brought many artists and scholars from Hainault who contributed to English culture.

When she died, Edward never really recovered, and she was much mourned by him and the country. King Edward had a beautiful sculpture made for her tomb which you can see today at Westminster Abbey.

Sourced from the Black Cultural Archives

Sources

  1. Stephen R. Myers,

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Edward The Black Prince PLANTAGENET

M, #I971, b. 15 June 1330, d. 08 June 1376

Family

Marriage 1 : Joan Fair Maid of KENT m. 1348, b. 29 September 1328, d. 08 August 1385

  1. Edward of ANGOULÊME, b. 27 January 1365, d. 20 September 1372
  2. Richard II PLANTAGENET, b. 06 JAN 1366/67, d. 14 FEB 1399/00

Marriage 2 : Edith DE WILLESFORD m. UNKNOWN Berkshire, England, b. abt. 1330, d. abt. 1385

  1.    John of Southeray DE GALEIS, b. abt. 1364, d. 1383
  2. Sir Roger De Clarendon PLANTAGENET, b. abt. 1357, d. abt. 1402

Notes:

Although Edward never reigned as King of England he has gone down in history as a great medieval military leader, achieving notable victories against England's Medieval rivals, the French, in the Hundred Years War.

Edward, the eldest son of Edward IIII and Phillipa of Hainault, daughter of William, Count of Hainault, was born on 15 June, 1330 at the royal Palace of Woodstock in Oxfordshire. Edward III, on 16 September, alloted five hundred marks a year from the the profits of the county of Chester for his maintenance, and in the following February, the whole of these profits were assigned to Queen Phillipa for his maintainance.

He was created Prince of Wales on 12 May, 1343, aged twelve, at Westminster and was also created Earl of Chester and Duke of Cornwall, making him the first English Duke. He was one of the original Knights of the Order of the Garter, an order of chivalry founded by his father. During his lifetime he was known as Edward of Woodstock; the title of Black Prince was adopted after his death and is a possible reference to his black armour.

Edward exhibited military ability at an early age, covering himself in glory at the Battle of Crecy on 26th August, 1346, during his father's campaign to acquire the throne of France. The prince commanded the right wing of the English forces in the battle and played a major role in the defeat of the French at the age of but sixteen. When Edward III encountered his son after the battle, he embraced him with emotion and declared that he had acquitted himself loyally.

Legend relates that the Black Prince acquired his arms of the Prince of Wales feathers from the blind King John I of Bohemia , who perished heroically in the conflict. In the aftermath of the battle, the prince happened upon the body of the dead King John, taking his helmet lined with ostrich feathers. The feathers and the dead king's motto 'Ich dien' (I serve) were adopted by Edward as his own badge, they have been used by every subsequent Princes of Wales since.

In 1355, he was appointed his father's lieutenant in Gascony and the following year led another significant victory against the French at Poitiers, taking the French King John prisoner, whom he treated with ostentatious chivalry and magnanimity. He was later created Prince of Aquitaine and Gascony.

Edward married his cousin Joan, Fair Maid of Kent in 1362 at Windsor Castle, Joan was the daughter and heiress of Edmund Plantagenet, Earl of Kent and grand-daughter of Edward I and his second wife Margaret of France. She possessed a chequered marital history, being first married to Sir Thomas Holland in 1340, that same year, when Holland was absent on campaign, Joan contracted a further marriage with William Montagu, Earl of Salisbury. In 1349 Holland successfully petitioned the Pope for his wife's return causing a great scandal at the time. Joan's brother died in 1352 and she became Countess of Kent in her own right. The marriage of Edward and Joan produced two children, Edward of Angouleme born in 1365, and Richard of Bordeaux, later Richard II who was born on 6 January 1367. Froissart described their household as especially magnificent. The young Edward died in 1372 at the age of six, leaving the second son, Richard of Bordeaux, as his father's heir. His parents were said to be grief stricken and much affected.

Sources

  1. Stephen R. Myers,
  2. England, Extracted Parish and Court Records,
  3. Web: Netherlands, GenealogieOnline Trees Index, 1000-Current (in Dutch),
  4. U.K. and Ireland, Find A Grave Index, 1300s-Current,

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Joan Fair Maid of KENT

F, #I972, b. 29 September 1328, d. 08 August 1385

Family

Marriage 1 : Edward The Black Prince PLANTAGENET m. 1348, b. 15 June 1330, d. 08 June 1376

  1. Edward of ANGOULÊME, b. 27 January 1365, d. 20 September 1372
  2. Richard II PLANTAGENET, b. 06 JAN 1366/67, d. 14 FEB 1399/00

Notes:

Princess Joan, LG, suo jure 4th Countess of Kent, 5th Baroness Wake of Liddell (19 September 1328 - 7 August 1385), known to history as The Fair Maid of Kent, was the first post-conquest Princess of Wales as wife to Edward, the Black Prince, son and heir of King Edward III. Although the French chronicler Jean Froissart called her "the most beautiful woman in all the realm of England, and the most loving", the appellation "Fair Maid of Kent" does not appear to be contemporary.[1] Joan assumed the title of 4th Countess of Kent and 5th Baroness Wake of Liddell after the death of her brother, John, in 1352.
Joan was the daughter of Edmund of Woodstock, 1st Earl of Kent, and Margaret Wake, 3rd Baroness Wake of Liddell.[2] Her father Edmund was the son of King Edward I and his second wife, Margaret of France, daughter of Philip III of France. Edmund's support of his older half-brother, King Edward II of England, placed him in conflict with the queen, Isabella of France, and her lover Roger Mortimer, 1st Earl of March. Edmund was executed after Edward II's deposition, and Joan's mother, along with her children, was placed under house arrest in Arundel Castle when Joan was only two years old.

Sources

  1. Stephen R. Myers,
  2. Monarchs of England,

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Lionel Duke of Clarence PLANTAGENET

M, #I973, b. 29 November 1338, d. 17 October 1368

Family

Marriage 1 : Lady Elizabeth of BURGH m. UNKNOWN, b. 06 July 1332, d. 10 December 1363

  1.    Philippa PLANTAGENET, b. 16 August 1355

Sources

  1. Stephen R. Myers,
  2. England, Extracted Parish and Court Records,
  3. U.K. and Ireland, Find A Grave Index, 1300s-Current,

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Lady Elizabeth of BURGH

F, #I974, b. 06 July 1332, d. 10 December 1363

Family

Marriage 1 : Lionel Duke of Clarence PLANTAGENET m. UNKNOWN, b. 29 November 1338, d. 17 October 1368

  1.    Philippa PLANTAGENET, b. 16 August 1355

Sources

  1. Stephen R. Myers,
  2. Web: Netherlands, GenealogieOnline Trees Index, 1000-Current (in Dutch),
  3. U.K. and Ireland, Find A Grave Index, 1300s-Current,

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Philippa PLANTAGENET

M, #I975, b. 16 August 1355

Sources

  1. Stephen R. Myers,

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Duke of Lancaster John of GAUNT

M, #I976, b. March 1339, d. 1399

Sources

  1. Stephen R. Myers,

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Thomas Earl of Buckingham PLANTAGENET

M, #I977, b. 07 JAN 1354/55, d. 08 September 1397

Family

Marriage 1 : Lady Eleanor DE BOHUM m. UNKNOWN Oxfordshire, England, b. abt. 1366, d. 03 October 1399

Sources

  1. Stephen R. Myers,
  2. Oxford University Alumni, 1500-1886,
  3. Monarchs of England,
  4. Web: International, Find A Grave Index,

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Edward II King of England CAERNARFON

M, #I978, b. 25 April 1284, d. 21 September 1327

Family

Marriage 1 : Isabella of FRANCE m. 25 January 1308 Boulogne, Hauts-de-Seine, Île-de-France, France, b. 1295, d. 22 August 1358

  1. Edward III King of ENGLAND, b. 13 November 1312, d. 21 June 1377

Notes:

[Myers.ftw]

King of England, was the son of Edward I., and was born at Carnarvon (Caernarfon) in 1284. He succeeded his father in 1307, and was governed by his favourites, Gaveston and the Despensers, which occasioned the barons to rise against him. After resigning his crown, he was confined in Berkeley Castle, Gloucestershire, and was there traitorously murdered by the contrivance of his queen, Isabella, and her favourite, Roger Mortimer; Earl of March, in 1328. His deposition took place in 1327.

Sources

  1. Stephen R. Myers,

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Isabella of FRANCE

F, #I979, b. 1295, d. 22 August 1358

Family

Marriage 1 : Edward II King of England CAERNARFON m. 25 January 1308 Boulogne, Hauts-de-Seine, Île-de-France, France, b. 25 April 1284, d. 21 September 1327

  1. Edward III King of ENGLAND, b. 13 November 1312, d. 21 June 1377

Notes:

Isabella of France, sometimes described as the She-Wolf of France, was Queen of England as the wife of Edward II. She was the youngest surviving child and only surviving daughter of Philip IV of France and Joan I of Navarre

Sources

  1. Stephen R. Myers,

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Edward I King of England LONGSHANKS

M, #I980, b. 17 June 1239, d. 07 July 1307

Family

Marriage 1 : Eleanor of CASTILE m. 18 October 1254 Spain, b. abt. 1244, d. 29 November 1290

  1. Edward II King of England CAERNARFON, b. 25 April 1284, d. 21 September 1327
  2. Elizabeth Princess of England PLANTAGENET, b. 07 August 1282, d. 05 May 1316
  3. Joan of Acre PLANTAGENET, b. abt. 1272, d. 23 April 1307

Marriage 2 : Margaret of FRANCE m. 1291, b. abt. 1279, d. 14 FEB 1317/18

Notes:

[Myers.ftw]

(Longshanks), king of England, eldest son of Henry III. and his queen, Eleanor of Provence, was born in 1239. At ten years of age he was named governor of Gascony, and married in 1254 the Princess Eleanor of Castile. He took a prominent part in state affairs during the latter part of his father's reign, and showed that ability, quick energy, and decision of character which distinguished him throughout his reign. In the barons' war, which began in 1261, he had generally the conduct of the royal forces; was defeated and taken prisoner by De Montfort at Lewes, in 1264; escaped the next year, and defeated De Montfort at Evesham, thus securing the liberty of his father, and ended the war by the reduction of the Isle of Ely in 1267. He soon after took the
cross, and set out to join St. Louis in the crusade, but did not arrive in the Holy Land till 1271. After various successes and a narrow escape from assassination - -his wife, it is said, sucking the poison from his arm --he set out on his return, arriving in England in August, 1274. He had been proclaimed king on the death of his father nearly two years previously, and was crowned, with his queen, soon after his arrival.

War filled up the greater part of his reign. The principal events are the conquest of Wales and the wars with Scotland. Llewellyn, prince of Wales, refusing to attend the English parliament and do homage, was defeated by Edward in 1277 ; and having again revolted, was again defeated, and at last slain in 1282. Edward built many castles in Wales, and settled the government by the statute of Rhuddlan. He treated the Jews with great cruelty and injustice, hung hundreds of them on a charge of clipping the coin, and in 1290 banished them. In 1291 the numerous competitors for the
crown of Scotland submitted their claims to Edward's decision, which was in favour of John de Baliol. Baliol did homage to Edward, and was made to feel his dependence too keenly; so that war soon broke out between the two kingdoms. Then came the terrible devastation of Scotland, temporary submission, insurrection of Wallace, his victory of Stirling, his defeat at Falkirk, numerous invasions and truces, capture and execution of the great patriot leader, fresh revolt, and coronation of Robert Bruce in 1306, and a final expedition against the Scots in the following year, which was cut short by the death of Edward at Burgh-on-the- Sands, near Carlisle, 7th July,
1307. Very great and important legislative changes took place in this reign. Edward left by his first wife, four sons and nine daughters; and by his second, Margaret of France, whom he married in 1299, two sons and one daughter. Margaret survived him.

Sources

  1. Stephen R. Myers,
  2. U.K. and Ireland, Find A Grave Index, 1300s-Current,

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Eleanor of CASTILE

F, #I981, b. abt. 1244, d. 29 November 1290

Family

Marriage 1 : Edward I King of England LONGSHANKS m. 18 October 1254 Spain, b. 17 June 1239, d. 07 July 1307

  1. Edward II King of England CAERNARFON, b. 25 April 1284, d. 21 September 1327
  2. Elizabeth Princess of England PLANTAGENET, b. 07 August 1282, d. 05 May 1316
  3. Joan of Acre PLANTAGENET, b. abt. 1272, d. 23 April 1307

Sources

  1. Stephen R. Myers,
  2. U.K. and Ireland, Find A Grave Index, 1300s-Current,

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Elizabeth Princess of England PLANTAGENET

F, #I982, b. 07 August 1282, d. 05 May 1316

Family

Marriage 1 : Humphrey Earl of Herford DE BOHUN, VIII m. 14 November 1302 Wesminster, b. abt. 1276, d. 16 March 1322

  1. Eleanor Countess of Ormonde DE BOHUN, b. 17 October 1304, d. 07 October 1363
  2. Margaret of BOHUN, b. 1311, d. 16 December 1391

Sources

  1. Stephen R. Myers,
  2. England, Extracted Parish and Court Records,
  3. U.K. and Ireland, Find A Grave Index, 1300s-Current,

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Humphrey Earl of Herford DE BOHUN, VIII

M, #I983, b. abt. 1276, d. 16 March 1322

Family

Marriage 1 : Elizabeth Princess of England PLANTAGENET m. 14 November 1302 Wesminster, b. 07 August 1282, d. 05 May 1316

  1. Eleanor Countess of Ormonde DE BOHUN, b. 17 October 1304, d. 07 October 1363
  2. Margaret of BOHUN, b. 1311, d. 16 December 1391

Sources

  1. Stephen R. Myers,
  2. U.K. and Ireland, Find A Grave Index, 1300s-Current,

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Lady Eleanor Countess of Ormonde DE BOHUN

F, #I984, b. 17 October 1304, d. 07 October 1363

Family

Marriage 1 : James Earl of Ormond BUTLER m. 1327 Yorkshire, England, b. abt. 1305, d. 06 January 1337

Sources

  1. Stephen R. Myers,
  2. Monarchs of England,

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Margaret of BOHUN

F, #I985, b. 1311, d. 16 December 1391

Family

Marriage 1 : Hugh 2nd Earl of Devonshire DE COURTENEY m. UNKNOWN Devon, England, b. 12 July 1303, d. 02 May 1377

Sources

  1. Stephen R. Myers,

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James Earl of Ormond BUTLER

M, #I986, b. abt. 1305, d. 06 January 1337

Family

Marriage 1 : Eleanor Countess of Ormonde DE BOHUN m. 1327 Yorkshire, England, b. 17 October 1304, d. 07 October 1363

Sources

  1. Stephen R. Myers,
  2. Dictionary of National Biography, Volumes 1-20, 22,
  3. Web: International, Find A Grave Index,

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Joan of Acre PLANTAGENET

F, #I987, b. abt. 1272, d. 23 April 1307

Family

Marriage 1 : Earl of Clare Gilbert The Red DE CLARE m. 30 April 1290 Westminster Abbey, London, England, b. 02 September 1243, d. 07 December 1295

Sources

  1. Stephen R. Myers,
  2. Suffolk, England, Extracted Parish Records,
  3. Web: Netherlands, GenealogieOnline Trees Index, 1000-Current (in Dutch),
  4. U.K. and Ireland, Find A Grave Index, 1300s-Current,

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Earl of Clare Gilbert The Red DE CLARE

M, #I988, b. 02 September 1243, d. 07 December 1295

Family

Marriage 1 : Joan of Acre PLANTAGENET m. 30 April 1290 Westminster Abbey, London, England, b. abt. 1272, d. 23 April 1307

Sources

  1. Stephen R. Myers,
  2. Monarchs of England,
  3. England, Extracted Parish and Court Records,
  4. Web: Netherlands, GenealogieOnline Trees Index, 1000-Current (in Dutch),

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Henry III King of England BEAUCLERC

M, #I989, b. 01 October 1207, d. 16 November 1272

Family

Marriage 1 : Eleonore Leonor of PROVENCE m. 14 January 1236 Canterbury, Kent, England, b. abt. 1223, d. 25 June 1291

  1. Edward I King of England LONGSHANKS, b. 17 June 1239, d. 07 July 1307
  2. Edmund Earl of Lancaster CROUCHBACK, b. 16 JAN 1244/45, d. 05 June 1296

Notes:

[Myers.ftw]

King of England, eldest son of King John and Isabella of Angoulême, was born at Winchester in 1207. He succeeded his father in 1216 and was crowned at Gloucester, in the presence of Gualo, the papal legate, predecessor of Pandulf and one of the guardians of the young king, 28th October of that year. The regency was entrusted to William Marshal, Earl of Pembroke who in 1217 defeated the French army at Lincoln, and compelled the Dauphin Louis to retire to France. On Pembroke's death, in May, 1219, Hubert de Burgh and Peter des Roches, Bishop of Winchester, became regents; but mutual jealousies and dissensions disturbed their administration and weakened their power. Henry was crowned a second time, in 1220, and two years later was
declared of age, but his feebleness of character unfitted him to role, and the real power remained with his ministers.

His fondness for foreign counsellors, his unsuccessful wars with France, and his attempts to govern without parliaments, excited much ill-humour in the nation. This was increased by the papal exactions which he permitted, and by the heavy impositions on his subjects, made necessary by his acceptance of the crown of Sicily for his son Edmund. At length, in 1258, he was virtually deposed by the 'Mad Parliament,' which assembled at Oxford, and a council of state was formed under the presidency of Simon de Montfort. The popular leaders quarrelled among themselves, while the king was a prisoner in their hands. But in 1262 civil war began, the king being compelled to employ foreign mercenaries. In 1264 the battle of Lewes was fought, at
which the king, Prince Edward, Earl Richard, King of the Romans, and his son Henry, were made prisoners by the barons. Soon after De Montfort, now virtually sovereign, summoned a parliament, which met in January, 1265, and was the first to which knights of the shire and representatives of cities and boroughs were called; thus constituting the first House of Commons. In August of that year De Montfort was defeated and killed by Prince Edward at the battle of Evesham, and the king regained his liberty. But the war lasted two years longer. In 1270 Prince Edward set out on the crusade, and before his return Henry died at Westminster, November 16,1272.

Sources

  1. Stephen R. Myers,
  2. Web: Netherlands, GenealogieOnline Trees Index, 1000-Current (in Dutch),
  3. Monarchs of England,

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Eleonore Leonor of PROVENCE

F, #I990, b. abt. 1223, d. 25 June 1291

Family

Marriage 1 : Henry III King of England BEAUCLERC m. 14 January 1236 Canterbury, Kent, England, b. 01 October 1207, d. 16 November 1272

  1. Edward I King of England LONGSHANKS, b. 17 June 1239, d. 07 July 1307
  2. Edmund Earl of Lancaster CROUCHBACK, b. 16 JAN 1244/45, d. 05 June 1296

Notes:

Eleanor of Provence (c. 1223 - 24/25 June 1291[1]) was Queen consort of England, as the spouse of King Henry III of England, from 1236 until his death in 1272.

Although she was completely devoted to her husband, and staunchly defended him against the rebel Simon de Montfort, 6th Earl of Leicester, she was very much hated by the Londoners. This was because she had brought a large number of relatives with her to England in her retinue; these were known as "the Savoyards", and they were given influential positions in the government and realm. On one occasion, Eleanor's barge was attacked by angry citizens who pelted her with stones, mud, pieces of paving, rotten eggs and vegetables.

Eleanor was the mother of five children including the future King Edward I of England. She also was renowned for her cleverness, skill at writing poetry, and as a leader of fashion.

Sources

  1. Stephen R. Myers,
  2. Monarchs of England,
  3. Web: International, Find A Grave Index,

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Edmund Earl of Lancaster CROUCHBACK

M, #I991, b. 16 JAN 1244/45, d. 05 June 1296

Family

Marriage 1 : Blanche D'ARTOIS m. 1269 Paris, Île-de-France, France, b. 1248, d. 02 May 1302

  1. Henry Earl of LANCASTER, b. 1281, d. 22 September 1345

Notes:

Edmund Crouchback (16 January 1245 - 5 June 1296) was the second surviving son of King Henry III of England of the House of Plantagenet and Queen Eleanor of Provence. In his childhood he had a claim on the Kingdom of Sicily, but he never ruled there. In 1265 he was granted all the lands of Simon de Montfort and from 1267 he was titled Earl of Leicester. In that year he also began to rule Lancashire, but he did not take the title Earl of Lancaster until 1276. Between 1276 and 1284 he was also Count of Champagne and Brie, governing those counties in right of his second wife, Blanche of Artois, until her daughter from a previous marriage came of age. His nickname, "Crouchback" (meaning "crossed -back"), refers to his participation in the Ninth Crusade

Sources

  1. Stephen R. Myers,
  2. Dictionary of National Biography, Volumes 1-20, 22,
  3. Web: International, Find A Grave Index,

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Blanche D'ARTOIS

F, #I992, b. 1248, d. 02 May 1302

Family

Marriage 1 : Edmund Earl of Lancaster CROUCHBACK m. 1269 Paris, Île-de-France, France, b. 16 JAN 1244/45, d. 05 June 1296

  1. Henry Earl of LANCASTER, b. 1281, d. 22 September 1345

Notes:

Blanche of Artois (Blanche d'Artois) (1248 - 2 May 1302) was the queen consort of Navarre; after her husband Henry I of Navarre's death, she served as regent from 1274 to 1284 on behalf of her daughter, Joan I. Besides Navarre, she ruled the counties of Brie, Champagne, Troyes and Meaux.

In 1276, she became Countess of Lancaster by marrying into the English royal family.

She was the daughter of Matilda of Brabant and Robert I, Count of Artois.

Sources

  1. Stephen R. Myers,
  2. U.K. and Ireland, Find A Grave Index, 1300s-Current,

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Henry Earl of LANCASTER

M, #I993, b. 1281, d. 22 September 1345

Family

Marriage 1 : Maud CHAWORTH m. bef. 02 MAR 1296/97, b. 02 FEB 1281/82, d. 03 December 1322

  1.    Maud of LANCASTER, b. 1298, d. 05 May 1377
  2.    Blanche of LANCASTER, b. 1297, d. abt. 12 July 1380

Notes:

Henry, 3rd Earl of Leicester and Lancaster (c. 1281 - 22 September 1345) was an English nobleman, one of the principals behind the deposition of Edward II of England

Sources

  1. Stephen R. Myers,
  2. Duston/Dustin Family Association,

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John King of England LACKLAND

M, #I994, b. 24 December 1166, d. 19 October 1216

Family

Marriage 1 : Isabella of Angoulême TAILLEFER m. 26 August 1200 Bordeaux, Gironde, Aquitaine, France, b. abt. 1188, d. 31 May 1246

  1. Richard of Cornwall PLANTAGENET, b. 05 January 1209, d. 02 April 1272
  2. Queen of Scotland England PLANTAGENET, b. 22 July 1210, d. 04 March 1238
  3. Isabella (Elizabeth) Empress OF GERMANY PLANTAGENET, b. 1214, d. 01 December 1241
  4. Eleanor PLANTAGENET, b. abt. 1215, d. 13 April 1275
  5. Henry III King of England BEAUCLERC, b. 01 October 1207, d. 16 November 1272

Notes:

[Myers.ftw]

John was born on Christmas Eve 1166, the youngest son of Henry II and Eleanor of Aquitane. His parents drifted apart after his birth, and his youth was divided between his eldest brother's house where he learned the art of knighthood and the house of his father's justiciar, Ranulf Glanvil, where he learned the business of government. As the fourth child, inherited lands were not available to him, giving rise to his nickname, Lackland. His first marriage, to Isabel of Gloucester, lasted but ten years and was fruitless; Isabella of Angouleme, his second wife, bore him two sons (Henry and Richard) and three daughters (Joan, Isabella and Eleanor). He also had an illegitimate daughter, named Joan, who married Llywelyn the Great, Ruler of All Wales , from which the Tudor line of monarchs was descended. The Angevin family feuds left quite a mark on John - he proved his betrayal to both his father and his brother Richard. He and Richard clashed in 1184 when the elder refused to turn Aquitane over to the younger brother, as dictated by Henry II. The following year Henry sent John to rule Ireland, but John alienated the native Irish and the transplanted Anglo-Normans who emigrated to carve out new lordships for themselves; the experiment was a total failure, and John returned home within six months. Richard, after accending to the throne in 1189, gave John vast estates to appease his younger brother, but to no avail. He tried to overthrow Richard's administrators during the German captivity, but failed. He conspired with Philip II in another attempt, which again failed. Upon Richard's release in 1194, John was forced to sue for pardon and spent the next five years in his brother's shadow, staying out of trouble long enough to be named heir to the crown.

John's reign was full of trouble. A quarrel with the Church resulted in England being placed under an interdict in 1207, with John excommunicated two years later. The dispute, centered around John's refusal to install the papal candidate, Stephen Langdon, as Archbishop of Canterbury. This dispute was not resolved until John surrendered to the wishes of Innocent III, one of the greatest medieval popes. A succession dispute with his nephew, Arthur of Brittany, ultimately resulted in the loss French territories, as the king's French vassals preferred Arthur. By spring 1205, John had crossed the Channel back into England as the last of his French possessions fell out of his hands. From 1206 to the end of his reign, John was preoccupied with regaining these territories, levying a number of new taxes upon the landed barons to pay for his campaigns. This would have been satisfactory had John been winning battles, but the French continually trounced him. The discontented rebel barons revolted and captured London in May 1215. In June, at Runnymeade, John met with the barons and signed the Magna Carta, a feudal rights document stressing three points:
1) the Church was free to make its own appointments,
2) no more than the normal amounts of money could be collected to run the government, unless the king's feudal tenants gave their content and
3) no freeman was to be punished except in concert with the common law. This document proved to be the forerunner of modern constitutions. John signed the document as a means of buying time and failed to keep his word. The nobility called for French assistance and John died in the midst of an invasion.

John was remembered in elegant fashion by Sir Richard Baker in A Chronicle of the Kings of England : "...his works of piety were very many ... as far his actions, he neither came to the crown by justice, nor held it with any honour, nor left it peace." John's treacherous nature was the cause of the greatest loss of English continental territory until Hundred Years' War (1337-1453).

Sources

  1. Stephen R. Myers,
  2. Buckinghamshire, England, Extracted Parish Records,
  3. Monarchs of England,
  4. U.K. and Ireland, Find A Grave Index, 1300s-Current,

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Isabella of Angoulême TAILLEFER

F, #I995, b. abt. 1188, d. 31 May 1246

Family

Marriage 1 : John King of England LACKLAND m. 26 August 1200 Bordeaux, Gironde, Aquitaine, France, b. 24 December 1166, d. 19 October 1216

  1. Richard of Cornwall PLANTAGENET, b. 05 January 1209, d. 02 April 1272
  2. Queen of Scotland England PLANTAGENET, b. 22 July 1210, d. 04 March 1238
  3. Isabella (Elizabeth) Empress OF GERMANY PLANTAGENET, b. 1214, d. 01 December 1241
  4. Eleanor PLANTAGENET, b. abt. 1215, d. 13 April 1275
  5. Henry III King of England BEAUCLERC, b. 01 October 1207, d. 16 November 1272

Notes:

[Myers.ftw]

She was betrothed to Hugh before she married John. After John's death she
retired to her native city and eventually married Hugh after about 3 years. Countess of Angoulême 1202.

Sources

  1. Stephen R. Myers,
  2. Monarchs of England,
  3. Web: Netherlands, GenealogieOnline Trees Index, 1000-Current (in Dutch),
  4. Web: International, Find A Grave Index,

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Henry II King of England CURTMANTLE

M, #I996, b. 05 MAR 1132/33, d. 06 July 1189

Family

Marriage 1 : Eleanor of Queen of England AQUITAINE m. 18 May 1152 Bordeaux, Gironde, Aquitaine, France, b. abt. 1122, d. 31 March 1204

  1. John King of England LACKLAND, b. 24 December 1166, d. 19 October 1216
  2. Richard I King of England COEUR DE LION, b. 08 September 1157, d. 06 April 1199
  3. Eleanor PLANTAGENET, b. 13 October 1162, d. 31 October 1214
  4. Prince William Count of Poiters PLANTAGENET, b. 17 August 1153, d. April 1156
  5. Henry The Young KING, b. 1155, d. 11 June 1183

Notes:

[Myers.ftw]

Henry II., King of England, first of the Plantagenet line, was the eldest son of Geoffrey, Earl of Anjou, and his wife, the ex-Empress Maud, daughter of Henry I., and was born at Mans, in March, 1133. He received his education in England, under the care of his uncle Robert, Earl of Gloucester. On the death of his father, in 1151, he succeeded to the earldom of Anjou, Touraine, and Maine, and in the following year, by his marriage with Eleanor of Aquitaine, the divorced wife of Louis VII. of France, he became possessor of the duchy of Aquitaine or Guienne. The same year he invaded England, but a treaty was concluded, in 1153, by which it was agreed that he should succeed to the throne of England on the death of Stephen. This event took place in October, 1154, and Henry was crowned without opposition at Westminster, in December. His first measures were directed to the redress of the disorders and anarchy which had prevailed in the reign of Stephen. He seized and destroyed most of the baronial castles; dismissed the foreign troops; renewed the charter granted by Henry I. ; and resumed most of the lands which had been alienated from the crown by Stephen.

On the death of his brother Geoffrey he claimed and got possession of Nantes, and was thus master of the whole western coast of France. His attempt on Toulouse, in 1159, involved him in a war with the King of France, which was only terminated two years later. In 1162 Thomas a Becket was elected Archbishop of Canterbury, and the great struggle between the civil and ecclesiastical powers began, which resulted in the Constitutions of Clarendon, the exile and murder of Becket, war with France, the king's penance at Becket's tomb, and the repeal of the Constitutions. In 1171 Henry invaded Ireland, and, under the authority of a bull of Pope Adrian IV., which had been published in 1156, effected a conquest of that island.

The remaining years of his reign were embittered by the numerous revolts of his sons, instigated by their mother. Eleanor, whose jealousy was excited by the king's affection for Fair Rosamond, attempted to follow her sons to the court of France, but was seized and imprisoned during Henry's life. The King of Scotland, who supported the rebellion of the young princes, was taken prisoner at Alnwick, in 1174, but was released after a few months, on doing homage to Henry. A formal reconciliation with the princes took place, but was followed by a fresh revolt and civil war. Prince Henry, who, as heir-apparent, had been crowned in 1170, died in France, in 1183. Geoffrey was killed at a tournament, two years later; and John joined his brother Richard in a new rebellion against their father, in which they were aided by Philip Augustus.

The old king was prostrated by sickness, and the revolt of his youngest son John was the last and fatal blow from which he could not recover. He died at Chinon, July 6, 1189, and was buried at Foutevraud. Notwithstanding the conflicting estimates of the character and measures of Henry II., viewed as the champion of state supremacy, it is evident that he was a man of powerful intellect superior education, great energy, activity, and decisiveness, and also of impetuous passions. Ruling almost despotically, he greatly diminished the power of the nobles, and thus relieved the people of their intolerable tyranny. Good order and just administration of the laws were established and the practice of holding the assizes was introduced. He revived the trial by jury in
order to check the resort to trial by battle which he could not abolish.

Sources

  1. Stephen R. Myers,
  2. Global, Find A Grave Index for Non-Burials, Burials at Sea, and other Select Burial Locations, 1300s-Current,

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Eleanor of Queen of England AQUITAINE

F, #I997, b. abt. 1122, d. 31 March 1204

Family

Marriage 1 : Henry II King of England CURTMANTLE m. 18 May 1152 Bordeaux, Gironde, Aquitaine, France, b. 05 MAR 1132/33, d. 06 July 1189

  1. John King of England LACKLAND, b. 24 December 1166, d. 19 October 1216
  2. Richard I King of England COEUR DE LION, b. 08 September 1157, d. 06 April 1199
  3. Eleanor PLANTAGENET, b. 13 October 1162, d. 31 October 1214
  4. Prince William Count of Poiters PLANTAGENET, b. 17 August 1153, d. April 1156
  5. Henry The Young KING, b. 1155, d. 11 June 1183

Sources

  1. Stephen R. Myers,
  2. Global, Find A Grave Index for Non-Burials, Burials at Sea, and other Select Burial Locations, 1300s-Current,

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Richard I King of England COEUR DE LION

M, #I998, b. 08 September 1157, d. 06 April 1199

Family

Marriage 1 : Berengaria of NAVARRE m. 12 May 1191 Chapel of St George, Limasol, Cyprus, b. 1163, d. aft. 1230

  1. Philip Lord of COGNAC, b. abt. 1180, d. aft. 1201

Notes:

Richard I (8 September 1157 - 6 April 1199) was King of England from 6 July 1189 until his death. He also ruled as Duke of Normandy (as Richard IV), Duke of Aquitaine, Duke of Gascony, Lord of Cyprus, Count of Poitiers, Count of Anjou, Count of Maine, Count of Nantes, and Overlord of Brittany at various times during the same period. He was the third of five sons of King Henry II of England and Eleanor of Aquitaine. He was known as Richard Cœur de Lion or Richard the Lionheart because of his reputation as a great military leader and warrior.[1] The Muslims called him Melek-Ric (King Richard) or Malek al-Inkitar (King of England).[2] He was also known in Occitan as Oc e No (Yes and No), because of his reputation for terseness.[3]

By the age of 16, Richard had taken command of his own army, putting down rebellions in Poitou against his father.[1] Richard was a central Christian commander during the Third Crusade, leading the campaign after the departure of Philip II of France and scoring considerable victories against his Muslim counterpart, Saladin, although he did not retake Jerusalem from Saladin.[4]

Richard spoke langue d'oïl, a French dialect, and Occitan, a Romance language spoken in southern France and nearby regions.[5] Born in England, where he spent his childhood, he lived for most of his adult life before becoming king in his Duchy of Aquitaine in the southwest of France. Following his accession he spent very little time, perhaps as little as six months, in England, preferring to use his kingdom as a source of revenue to support his armies.[6] Nevertheless, he was seen as a pious hero by his subjects.[7] He remains one of the few kings of England remembered by his epithet, rather than regnal number, and is an enduring iconic figure both in England and in France.[8]

Sources

  1. Stephen R. Myers,
  2. Monarchs of England,
  3. Web: Netherlands, GenealogieOnline Trees Index, 1000-Current (in Dutch),

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Eleanor PLANTAGENET

F, #I999, b. 13 October 1162, d. 31 October 1214

Family

Marriage 1 : Alphonso VIII King of CASTILE m. UNKNOWN Burgos, Castilla-Leon, Spain, b. 01 November 1155, d. 05 October 1214

Notes:

Eleanor of England (Spanish: Leonor; 13 October 1162[1] - 31 October 1214[2]) was Queen of Castile and Toledo[3] as wife of Alfonso VIII of Castile.[4][5] She was the sixth child and second daughter of Henry II of England and Eleanor of Aquitaine[6] and received her first name as a namesake of her mother.[

Sources

  1. Stephen R. Myers,
  2. Monarchs of England,
  3. Web: Netherlands, GenealogieOnline Trees Index, 1000-Current (in Dutch),
  4. Web: International, Find A Grave Index,

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Alphonso VIII King of CASTILE

M, #I1000, b. 01 November 1155, d. 05 October 1214

Family

Marriage 1 : Eleanor PLANTAGENET m. UNKNOWN Burgos, Castilla-Leon, Spain, b. 13 October 1162, d. 31 October 1214

Notes:

Alfonso VIII (11 November 1155[1] - 5 October 1214), called the Noble or el de las Navas, was the King of Castile from 1158 to his death and King of Toledo.[2][3] He is most remembered for his part in the Reconquista and the downfall of the Almohad Caliphate. After having suffered a great defeat with his own army at Alarcos against the Almohads in 1195,[4] he led the coalition of Christian princes and foreign crusaders who broke the power of the Almohads in the Battle of the Navas de Tolosa in 1212, an event which marked the arrival of a tide of Christian supremacy on the Iberian peninsula.

His reign saw the domination of Castile over León and, by his alliance with Aragon, he drew those two spheres of Christian Iberia into close connection.

Sources

  1. Stephen R. Myers,
  2. Web: Netherlands, GenealogieOnline Trees Index, 1000-Current (in Dutch),
  3. Global, Find A Grave Index for Non-Burials, Burials at Sea, and other Select Burial Locations, 1300s-Current,

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Geoffrey IV Count of ANJOU

M, #I1001, b. 24 August 1113, d. 07 September 1151

Family

Marriage 1 : Matilda "Maud" Empress of ENGLAND m. 22 May 1127 Sarthe, Pays de la Loire, France, b. 07 February 1102, d. 10 September 1167

  1. Henry II King of England CURTMANTLE, b. 05 MAR 1132/33, d. 06 July 1189

Notes:

Geoffrey V (24 August 1113 - 7 September 1151) - called the Handsome (French: le Bel) and Plantagenet - was the Count of Anjou, Touraine, and Maine by inheritance from 1129 and then Duke of Normandy by conquest from 1144. By his marriage to the Empress Matilda, daughter and heiress of Henry I of England, Geoffrey had a son, Henry Curtmantle, who succeeded to the English throne and founded the Plantagenet dynasty to which Geoffrey gave his nickname.
He received his nickname, Plantagenet,[a] from the yellow sprig of broom blossom (genêt is the French name for the planta genista, or broom shrub) he wore in his hat.[4] King Henry I of England sent his royal legates to Anjou to arrange a marriage between Geoffrey and his daughter, Matilda.[5] Consent was given by both parties. On 10 June 1128 King Henry I knighted the fifteen-year-old Geoffrey

Sources

  1. Stephen R. Myers,
  2. Web: Netherlands, GenealogieOnline Trees Index, 1000-Current (in Dutch),

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Matilda "Maud" Empress of ENGLAND

F, #I1002, b. 07 February 1102, d. 10 September 1167

Family

Marriage 1 : Geoffrey IV Count of ANJOU m. 22 May 1127 Sarthe, Pays de la Loire, France, b. 24 August 1113, d. 07 September 1151

  1. Henry II King of England CURTMANTLE, b. 05 MAR 1132/33, d. 06 July 1189

Notes:

[Myers.ftw]

Matilda, or Maud, the Empress, was the daughter of Henry I. of England, and was married, in 1110, to the Emperor Henry V. On his death, in 1127, she married Geoffrey Plantagenet, Earl of Anjou, by whom she had a son, afterwards Henry II., King of England. She was nominated in 1135 successor to the English throne by her father; but in her absence Stephen usurped the title. Arriving in England with a large army in 1139, she defeated Stephen, and was acknowledged queen in a synod held in 1141.
Stephen afterwards defeated the Empress, and she was obliged to leave the kingdom. Matilda died in 1167, aged 67.

Sources

  1. Stephen R. Myers,

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Fulk V Count of ANJOU

M, #I1003, b. 1092, d. 10 November 1143

Family

Marriage 1 : Ermengarde of MAINE , b. abt. 1096, d. abt. 1126

  1. Geoffrey IV Count of ANJOU, b. 24 August 1113, d. 07 September 1151
  2. Sybil of D'ANJOU, b. 1112, d. 1165

Notes:

French Nobility. King of Jerusalem, Count of Anjou, Touraine and Maine, also known as Fulk V "The Young". He was the only son of Fulk IV "Le Rechin" of Anjou and his fifth wife Bertrade de Montfort, who left her husband to become first mistress and later wife of King Philipp. He succeeded his father in 1109 and continued the war with Maine that his father had started. He invaded it and in 1110 married Eremburge of Maine to strengthen his reign there. From this marriage he was father of Geoffrey, Isabel (wife of William "The Atheling"), Elias II, Count of Maine and Sibylle, (later wife of William Clito of Normandy and Count Thierry of Flanders). He reorganized the administration and signed peace settlements with the counties that surrounded his territory. In 1120 he joined the crusade where he made a name for himself, as being a good warrior. In 1127 he received a message from the king of Jerusalem, Baldwin II, who proposed a marriage between Fulk and Baldwins daughter and heiress, Melisende. He abdicated in Anjou in favor for his son Geoffrey and married Melisende in 1129. Baldwin gave him the cities Acre and Tyre. Melisende gave birth to a son who was named Baldwin and that was supposed to reign with his parents. After the kings death in 1131 they ruled together, but Fulk soon assumed control of the government and excluded her entirely. As he was also regent of Antioch he married the heiress Constance to Raymond of Poitiers, uncle of Eleonore of Aquitaine. The Count of Jaffa, Hugh II, a cousin of Melisende sided with her and rebelled against him. They later signed a peace contract and Hugh was exiled from the kingdom for 3 years. In 1135 the queen's party took over the government and Fulk's supporters fled. The couple reconciled later and she gave birth to a second son, Amalric. Fulk was able to strengthen the borders in the north and south and built several castles to secure the kingdom against the Muslims under Zengi and the Egyptians. He died during a hunting accident, when his horse stumbled, fell and landed on top of him.

Sources

  1. Stephen R. Myers,
  2. Web: Netherlands, GenealogieOnline Trees Index, 1000-Current (in Dutch),
  3. Web: International, Find A Grave Index,
  4. Global, Find A Grave Index for Non-Burials, Burials at Sea, and other Select Burial Locations, 1300s-Current,

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Ermengarde of MAINE

F, #I1004, b. abt. 1096, d. abt. 1126

Family

Marriage 1 : Fulk V Count of ANJOU , b. 1092, d. 10 November 1143

  1. Geoffrey IV Count of ANJOU, b. 24 August 1113, d. 07 September 1151
  2. Sybil of D'ANJOU, b. 1112, d. 1165

Sources

  1. Stephen R. Myers,

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Sybil of D'ANJOU

F, #I1005, b. 1112, d. 1165

Family

Marriage 1 : Thierry I of Lorraine Count of FLANDRE m. UNKNOWN Bas-Rhin, Alsace, France, b. 1099, d. 17 JAN 1167/68

Sources

  1. Stephen R. Myers,
  2. Web: Netherlands, GenealogieOnline Trees Index, 1000-Current (in Dutch),
  3. Global, Find A Grave Index for Non-Burials, Burials at Sea, and other Select Burial Locations, 1300s-Current,

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Thierry I of Lorraine Count of FLANDRE

M, #I1006, b. 1099, d. 17 JAN 1167/68

Family

Marriage 1 : Sybil of D'ANJOU m. UNKNOWN Bas-Rhin, Alsace, France, b. 1112, d. 1165

Notes:

Thierry of Alsace (Dietrich) (c. 1099 - January 17, 1168), in Flanders known as Diederik van den Elzas, was count of Flanders from 1128 to 1168. He was the youngest son of Duke Thierry II of Lorraine and Gertrude of Flanders (daughter of Robert I of Flanders). With a record of four campaigns in the Levant and Africa (including participation in the Second Crusade, the failed 1157-1158 siege of the Syrian city Shaizar, and the 1164 invasion of Egypt), he had a rare and distinguished record of commitment to crusading.

After the murder of his cousin Charles the Good in 1127, Thierry claimed the county of Flanders as grandson of Robert I, but William Clito became count instead with the support of King Louis VI of France. William's politics and attitude towards the autonomy of Flanders made him unpopular, and by the end of the year Bruges, Ghent, Lille, and Saint-Omer recognized Thierry as a rival count. Thierry's supporters came from the Imperial faction of Flanders, and upon his arrival he engaged in battle against William.

Louis VI of France had Raymond of Martigné, the Archbishop of Reims, excommunicate Thierry. Louis VI then besieged Lille, but was forced to retire when Henry I of England, William Clito's uncle, transferred his support to Thierry. However, Thierry was defeated at Tielt and Oostkamp and fled to Brugge. He was forced to flee Brugge as well, and went to Aalst, where he was soon under siege from William, Godfrey I of Leuven, and Louis VI. The city was about to be captured when William was found dead on July 27, 1128, leaving Thierry as the only claimant to the seat.

Thierry set up his government in Ghent and was recognized by all the Flemish cities as well as King Henry, who had his Flemish lords in England swear fealty to him. Thierry himself swore homage to Louis VI after 1132, in order to gain the French king's support against Baldwin IV, Count of Hainaut, who had advanced his own claim on Flanders.

Sources

  1. Stephen R. Myers,
  2. Global, Find A Grave Index for Non-Burials, Burials at Sea, and other Select Burial Locations, 1300s-Current,

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Fulk IV Count of ANJOU

M, #I1007, b. 1043, d. 14 April 1109

Family

Marriage 1 : Bertrade of MONTFORT , b. 1060, d. 1117

  1. Fulk V Count of ANJOU, b. 1092, d. 10 November 1143

Notes:

Fulk IV, byname Fulk the Surly, French Foulques le Réchin (born 1043, Château Landon, Fr.-died April 14, 1109, Angers), count of Anjou (1068-1109).

Geoffrey II Martel, son of Fulk III, pursued the policy of expansion begun by his father but left no sons as heirs. The countship went to his eldest nephew, Geoffrey III the Bearded. But the latter’s brother, Fulk, discontented over having inherited only a few small appanages, took advantage of the general discontent aroused by Geoffrey III’s inept rule, seized Saumur and Angers (1067), and cast Geoffrey first into prison at Sablé and later in the confines of Chinon castle (1068). Fulk’s reign then had to endure a series of conflicts against the several barons, Philip I of France, and the duke of Normandy. He lost some lands and was ridiculed when his wife, Bertrada of Montfort, took refuge with King Philip, but he secured, through battle and marriage, the countship of Maine for his son, Fulk V. An educated man, Fulk authored a unique chronicle of his family, derived largely from oral tradition and preserved only in fragments.

Sources

  1. Stephen R. Myers,
  2. Web: Netherlands, GenealogieOnline Trees Index, 1000-Current (in Dutch),
  3. Web: International, Find A Grave Index,

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Bertrade of MONTFORT

F, #I1008, b. 1060, d. 1117

Family

Marriage 1 : Fulk IV Count of ANJOU , b. 1043, d. 14 April 1109

  1. Fulk V Count of ANJOU, b. 1092, d. 10 November 1143

Sources

  1. Stephen R. Myers,

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Geoffrey II Count D' GASTINOIS

M, #I1009, b. 1000, d. 01 April 1045

Family

Marriage 1 : Ermengarde D' ANJOU m. UNKNOWN Nièvre, Bourgogne, France, b. abt. 1018, d. 21 MAR 1075/76

  1. Fulk IV Count of ANJOU, b. 1043, d. 14 April 1109

Sources

  1. Stephen R. Myers,
  2. Web: Netherlands, GenealogieOnline Trees Index, 1000-Current (in Dutch),

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Ermengarde D' ANJOU

F, #I1010, b. abt. 1018, d. 21 MAR 1075/76

Family

Marriage 1 : Geoffrey II Count D' GASTINOIS m. UNKNOWN Nièvre, Bourgogne, France, b. 1000, d. 01 April 1045

  1. Fulk IV Count of ANJOU, b. 1043, d. 14 April 1109

Notes:

French Nobility. Born the younger of the two daughters of Fulko 'Nerra' of Anjou and Hildegarde de Metz. She married Geoffrey II "Ferréol" de Château-Landon in 1035 and bore him three children. After his death she married about 1049 Robert de Bourgogne. After her brothers childless death in 1060 she inheirited Anjou for her sons, while her sisters sons received Vendôme. She and Robert were killed at the church of Saint-Fleurey-sur-Ouche.

Sources

  1. Stephen R. Myers,
  2. Web: International, Find A Grave Index,

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Geoffrey I Count of Gatinais DE GASTINOIS

M, #I1011, b. 970, d. 1000

Family

Marriage 1 : Beatrice of MACON m. bef. 999 Sarthe, Pays de la Loire, France, b. abt. 968, d. 21 June 1040

  1. Geoffrey II Count D' GASTINOIS, b. 1000, d. 01 April 1045

Sources

  1. Stephen R. Myers,

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Beatrice of MACON

F, #I1012, b. abt. 968, d. 21 June 1040

Family

Marriage 1 : Geoffrey I Count of Gatinais DE GASTINOIS m. bef. 999 Sarthe, Pays de la Loire, France, b. 970, d. 1000

  1. Geoffrey II Count D' GASTINOIS, b. 1000, d. 01 April 1045

Sources

  1. Stephen R. Myers,
  2. Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints, Online publication - Ancestry.com and The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. 1880 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: The Generations Network, Inc., 2005. 1880 U.S. Census Index provided by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints © Copyright 1999 Intellectual Reserve, Inc. All rights reserved. All use is subject to the limited use license and other terms and conditions applicable to this site.Original data - United States of America, Bureau of the Census. Tenth Census of the United States, 1880. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 1880.T9, 1,454 rolls. Minneapolis, Hennepin, Minnesota, ED 252, roll T9_622, page 443.3000, image 0706.

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Alberic II Count of MACON

M, #I1013, b. abt. 940, d. abt. 982

Family

Marriage 1 : Ermentrude DE ROUCY m. abt. 973 Loire, Rhône, Rhône-Alpes, France, b. 958, d. 03 MAR 1001/02

  1. Beatrice of MACON, b. abt. 968, d. 21 June 1040
  2. Beatrice DE MACON, b. abt. 983, d. 21 June 1040

Sources

  1. Stephen R. Myers,
  2. Web: Netherlands, GenealogieOnline Trees Index, 1000-Current (in Dutch),

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Ermentrude DE ROUCY

F, #I1014, b. 958, d. 03 MAR 1001/02

Family

Marriage 1 : Alberic II Count of MACON m. abt. 973 Loire, Rhône, Rhône-Alpes, France, b. abt. 940, d. abt. 982

  1. Beatrice of MACON, b. abt. 968, d. 21 June 1040
  2. Beatrice DE MACON, b. abt. 983, d. 21 June 1040

Sources

  1. Stephen R. Myers,
  2. Web: Netherlands, GenealogieOnline Trees Index, 1000-Current (in Dutch),

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